All Most Read Posts

Why progressives need to mobilize against Trump’s Supreme Court pick

by Nadia Eldemerdash

Donald Trump selected a clear partisan as his pick to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy who announced his resignation at the end of the Supreme Court’s term. Federal appeals court judge […]

Mixed Race: Racism and Anti-Blackness

by Mikka Macdonald

In the United States, race is still a social construct that shapes how other people treat you. No matter how you may personally identify, how someone else sees you can […]

Proposed Work Requirements Rule for SNAP Could Harm Those Already Facing Hunger

by Bobbi Dempsey

Implementing strict work requirements for safety net programs—particularly the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)—has been a recurring goal for many GOP leaders and the Trump administration. Concerned observers breathed a […]

Why Dr. Christine Blasey Ford is an American Hero

by Mikka Macdonald

If I ever have a daughter, I am going to tell her about the patriotism and heroism of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford. And if I ever have a daughter, I […]

In Alaska, Changes To Snap Could Spell Disaster

by Jody Ellis

This piece was Co-published with Civil Eats Sarah was born in the Alaskan village of Utqiagvik (formerly known as Barrow) and she spent a good portion of her youth there. […]

Returning to Life Outside Prison—Without Food on the Table

by Willie Francois

This piece was co-published with Civil Eats Calvin* anticipates walking out of a New Jersey prison next month, hopefully for the last time, eager to live out his responsibilities as […]

Mixed Feelings: White Enough

by Mikka Macdonald

“I don’t look black, I’m not treated black, but I feel black. I know I’m white-passing and frankly, it’s frustrating,” said James, 32. “I feel like I’m whitewashing my own […]

Here’s why America is talking about Universal Child Care

by Marisol Bello

This week, Senator Elizabeth Warren unveiled her plan for Universal Child Care, signaling its place atop the national political agenda. In it, she details the difficulties of finding affordable and […]

Citizenship Question on the U.S. Census Hurts Immigrant Families

by Mikka Macdonald

A Muslim ban. Family separation at the border. Ending Temporary Protected Status. And now, a question on the 2020 census asking each household a question about citizenship that is designed […]

Out of Time: Work Requirements and College Life

by Willie Francois

Almost one in eight Americans live under the discriminating tyranny of food insecurity. Bureaucratic hurdles to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)—formerly known as food stamps—stunt the strides of hardworking […]

The forced trajectory of Trinita Farmer, mother of police homicide victim, Tashii Brown

by Nissa Tzun

“He was very creative,” said Trinita Farmer about her son, Tashii Brown, during an interview in her home on March 4, 2018.  Farmer was eager to exhibit his work, which […]

The Tyranny And The Comfort Of Government Cheese

by Bobbi Dempsey

Co-published with Taste Government cheese shows up in the punch lines of jokes and song lyrics, but to those who have actually lived on it, it’s both a cornerstone of […]

Floridians tell us what matters to them and why the candidates for governor should care

by Laura Munoz

Florida voters will have a critical choice to make in November. For two decades, Florida has had a Republican governor with disastrous results for Floridians. Today, 3.3 million households – […]

This is what #AbolishICE really means

by Thomas Kennedy

Growing up, most of my friends and neighbors did not know what the acronym ICE stood for. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the agency which oversaw the detention and deportation of […]

Private prisons make more money the more people they keep incarcerated. In Florida, activists are working to stop the practice.

by Thomas Kennedy

As Americans we believe deeply in freedom and fairness. We believe that we should be free to pursue the American dream, no matter your station in life or where you […]

We need to sweep white supremacists out of office before we can really confront racism

by Thomas Kennedy

Last month, a viral video depicting New York lawyer Aaron Schlossberg’s racist rant against two Spanish speaking employees in a Manhattan deli seems to have left many shocked. Not me […]

Justice for marginalized communities not a factor in filling SCOTUS seat; it’s up to us to vote, voice our concerns now

by Alaina Beverly

Whether you care about voting rights, affirmative action, LGBTQ rights, immigrant rights and especially a woman’s right to control her own body, filling retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy’s […]

This Land Is Our Land: Diversity and Access in the Great Outdoors

by Mikka Macdonald

The United States’ National Park Service and wilderness recreation industry have never been more popular—and yet the American outdoor space is still largely and systematically out of reach for people […]

Immigrants, not France, are the real World Cup winners

by Thomas Kennedy

After weeks of suspense, France emerged the winner of the World Cup with a resounding 4-2 victory over Croatia. What is clear to anybody who watched the tournament from the […]

My Sister: A Domestic Worker. And My Hero!

by Sulma Arias

The movie Roma has received all kinds of recognition and acclaim, including three Academy awards. Its  star, Yalitza Aparcio, a first-time actor who portrayed the lead role of a housekeeper […]

We must fight to keep Nevada families from going hungry

by Nadia Eldemerdash

Like many Americans, I have always envisioned America as a country of plenty, a country of opportunity. In such a country, there is no reason for anyone to go hungry. […]

From zero tolerance to zero harm: steps for mending shattered migrant families

by Esther Calzada

By Catherine LaBrenz, John Sullivan and Esther Calzada We’ve all seen the excitement in a child’s eyes when they play with their parents in the park, or the calm that […]

How to Measure What We’re Losing: As this country moves further away from its humanity, who will be left to fight for what’s right?

by Elizabeth Fernandez

Wednesday was World Refugee Day. It’s supposed to be a day to bring awareness to the struggles faced by displaced people across the world. A day to reaffirm our commitment […]

In November, everything is on the line

by Nadia Eldemerdash

This piece originally published in the Las Vegas Sun. Every election year, the posters and signs go up announcing new candidates vying for political office. Every year, volunteers set out […]

The hourly reality of life on a ‘living wage’

by Catherine Bugayong

I am one of the 7.6 million Americans who has to work multiple jobs. I work three jobs so that I can meet my living expenses, pay bills, have health […]

Mixed Feelings: Exploring Multiracial Identity in America

by Mikka Macdonald

Race has always been a defining issue of this country: an undercurrent, bubbling up to tension points, changing and pushing the country in different directions. In 2019, race is at […]

Returning citizens served time and paid for their mistakes; let’s give them back their right to vote

by Thomas Kennedy

Last week, I experienced first-hand how the state of Florida is systematically disenfranchising black and brown people from voting. I took part in a civil disobedience action in the city […]

In Florida, we are voting to change the status-quo

by Maliha Kareem

With life changing decisions on the ballot, young people in Florida are gearing up for the 2018 elections to hold everyone accountable and make profound changes in our state’s Constitution. […]

Growing Up Poor in America Was My Political Education

by Michael Jackson

I remember, as a ten-year-old, tearfully watching former New York Governor Mario Cuomo and presidential candidate Jesse Jackson give impassioned speeches at the 1984 Democratic National Convention on my family’s […]

Separating children from parents is cruel, no matter your stand on immigration

by Thomas Kennedy

Last year, I spent an evening with immigrant youth from Homestead, a city and major agricultural area of south Florida. While there, I attended a workshop facilitated by Miami-based interdisciplinary […]

Florida voters gather at Netroots Nation to unite the vote

by Elizabeth Fernandez

I’m at Netroots Nation along with hundreds of political activists who are passionate about creating stronger communities for all. I took this opportunity to ask my fellow activists from Florida […]

What Apple’s $1 trillion value means for working people

by Elizabeth Poulos

Last Thursday, it was reported that the wealth of tech-giant Apple had surpassed every other publically traded American firm, setting the record at $1 trillion in value. Many applauded the […]

Puerto Rican Women Clap Back, Ready to Vote in November

by Laura Munoz

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez took the Democratic party by surprise early July when she won the primary race against long-term incumbent Rep. Joseph Crowley.  Since her victory, Ocasio-Cortez has been on the […]

Hate Has No Home Here

by Mikka Macdonald

Last week was the anniversary of the deadly Unite the Right Rally in Charlottesville and the neighborhoods of Washington, D.C. were tense. I was tense. The group of white supremacists […]

Have they lost their minds?

by Thomas Kennedy

Republican frontrunner for Florida Governor and member of Congress Ron Desantis has released what is arguably the most embarrassing political ad of the midterm elections. In the 30 second spot, […]

In full force ahead of Florida primaries

by Melissa Taveras

“I’m supposed to be in my bed today because I’ve been working hard the whole week, but instead I’m here because I need to let my neighbors, coworkers, families know […]

Eager to vote for the first time

by Laura Munoz

Voting is a rewarding experience and we are uniting first time voters this November to uplift our communities. You have the duty of electing people who will be representing you […]

Column: Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Wandra Green

I, like so many Americans of my era, believed… After 12 and a half years in an often stress-filled role as an associate director in public relations at a local […]

Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Melissa Chadburn

The work of community organizers is daunting. Late nights. Endless knocking on doors. Rallies and protests to protect our healthcare, ensure we all have enough food to eat and keep […]

Education, environment, and everything in between: Democratic Gubernatorial candidates talk politics in 2018

by Nadia Eldemerdash

Nevada’s primary elections are four short weeks away, and this year sees two Democratic candidates stepping up to the plate. Steve Sisolak, a local businessman and Clark County Commission chairman, […]

Haga la elección correcta Florida

by Thomas Kennedy

El 28 de agosto de 1963, el Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. se paró al pie del monumento a Abraham Lincoln en Washington D.C. para pronunciar su histórico discurso “Tengo […]

Column: Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Tomicka Robinson

Why we vote I’ve been asked a lot lately “why I knock on doors” to encourage people to vote. Mainly because of my background in social justice work. I’ve used […]

Make the right choice this November, Florida

by Thomas Kennedy

Florida has long been a bastion of conservative politics, but it has not always been this way. Since gaining statehood in 1845, Florida had voted for the most part Democratic. […]

Children belong with family, not caged in for-profit detention centers

by Thomas Kennedy

As the Trump administration continues to make it as difficult as possible for people fleeing extreme conditions to seek asylum within the United States, thousands of migrant children are sent […]

Their voices matter: Meet the #HumansOfDACA

by Nancy Treviño

Six months ago, President Trump broke a commitment when he ended DACA, a program supported by a majority of Americans and which gives 800,000 young people a chance to achieve […]

Voting to Make Florida’s Environment a Priority

by Maliha Kareem

Water is life.  And in many ways, it is what defines Florida. As a first generation American whose family came from Iraq, a nation with critical environment-related threats to human […]

Five decades since people of color were given the right to vote

by Topacio Marrero

It’s almost scary to think, but it’s only been 5 decades since people of color in America were effectively given the right to vote. This was accomplished because of how […]

Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Bobbi Dempsey

PA Group Strives to Bust Myths About SNAP—and People Who Use It Lisa Raditz cringes when she overhears some of the comments people make about SNAP recipients based on common […]

Power is when more women and people of color run for office. And win.

by Nadia Eldemerdash

With so much depressing news filling my news feed, I’ve found a glimmer of hope talking to Democratic candidates in the primary elections here in Nevada. As in the rest […]

In Florida, we steer which way we go at historic crossroads

by Thomas Kennedy

Florida is on the cusp of a historic moment. Democratic voters nominated Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum as the first black candidate for Governor in the history of the state. As […]

Coming to Terms with Privilege in the Face of White Supremacy

by Elizabeth Poulos

In the wake of Unite the Right II, I have been surprised by the reactions of some media pundits who feign surprised reactions by white nationalists taking to the streets […]

This Land is Our Land: Outgrowing Our Roots

by Mikka Macdonald

This Land is Our Land is a series about diversity in the American outdoors. You can read part one here. Today, approximately eighty percent of park visitors are white, and […]

What the War on Citizenship Means to Your Vote

by Elizabeth Fernandez

After 35 years in the United States, my father Joaquin Fernandez finally decided to become a citizen for one reason: He wanted to vote for the first woman president. From […]

There’s Too Much On the Line to Skip This Election

by Elizabeth Fernandez

With so much at stake in this election, in Florida and across the nation, voting this November is critical. That’s why former First Lady Michelle Obama visited the University of […]

Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Wandra Green

SNAP Benefits Guarantees Family’s Food Thirty-seven-year-old LeAnn is married with five children and five stepchildren (who live with their grandmother). She has a Master’s degree in business administration but can […]

Trump address to the nation is more anti-immigrant xenophobia

by Thomas Kennedy

Donald Trump presented no solutions during his first oval office address to the nation to end a more than two-week long government shutdown that has left 800,000 government workers working […]

Voting let me reclaim my voice when I needed it most

by Nadia Eldemerdash

In some ways, it was harder for me to believe that Barack Obama would get reelected than it was to believe that he was elected the first time. Surely, four […]

Kavanaugh Is Yet Another Way Trump Is Attacking Women

by Elizabeth Fernandez

Trump told us how he felt about women years before he was ever elected. We are just things to “grab.” According to him, “you can do anything” to us. In […]

On Motherhood and Movement Work: Women leaders approach both with ferocity and love

by Nicole Melaku

As I sat on the beautiful island of Puerto Rico for a retreat with fellow immigrant rights leaders from the Fair Immigration Reform Movement (FIRM), I couldn’t help but be […]

Our vote is our power

by Mikka Macdonald

Representative John Lewis once said, “The vote is precious. It is the most powerful non-violent tool we have in a democratic society, and we must use it.”  Every day, communities […]

Don’t know what the county assessor does? Here’s a primer for the little known elected positions in Nevada.

by Nadia Eldemerdash

As voters in a democratic country, it is crucial that we make educated decisions about who we put in office and the ballot measures we pass. Researching names is straightforward […]

Colin Kaepernick, Christine Blasey Ford, and the America’s Bad Conscience

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

In recent weeks, two Americans galvanized media attention for their bravery, taking  stances that inspired gratitude and support for their causes. Neither is a politician or has run for public […]

When will Nevada address police violence?

by Nissa Tzun

In the last decade, we have seen the issue of police violence resurface on the national platform. Every year since the police shooting of Oscar Grant on January 1, 2009, […]

Between Starshine and Clay: Power 50 leads women of color to turn big dreams into real change

by Cristina Rayas

Women of color are bringing bold, visionary leadership in greater numbers and with greater visibility, just look at the 116th Congress! Sadly, whether in Congress or within organizations their leadership […]

In the midterm elections voters sent a message: Affordable health care is a right

by Mikka Macdonald

Among the many takeaways from the 2018 midterm elections is the irrefutable fact that the Affordable Care Act is here to stay. Americans from red states and blue states used […]

Infographic on House v. Senate Farm Bill

by Vy Vu

June 2018, after the House passed its farm bill (H.R.2) with harmful SNAP amendments, the Senate passed its bill (S.3042) with bipartisan support that would mostly maintain SNAP status quo. […]

Silver Telly Award Shines Honor on Community Change’s “5 Organizers” Series

by Cristina Rayas

Today Community Change won a Silver Telly for 5 Organizers in 5 Decades, a video series that was part of our 50th Anniversary celebration. We won for the Campaign-Series: Non-scripted/Documentary […]

Travel bans enduring hostility toward Muslims

by Maliha Kareem

This piece was originally published in the Orlando Sentinel. When the U.S. Supreme Court upheld President Trump’s travel ban, imposing travel restrictions on several predominantly Muslim-majority countries, it affected many people in our […]

Building Resistance through Climate Awareness

by Topacio Marrero

Last week, the New Florida Majority, a statewide organizing group, sponsored a climate event that called attention to the impact of climate gentrification on our communities and called on vulnerable […]

The Blue Wave Won’t Happen Without Black and Brown Voters

by Thomas Kennedy

The Trump administration and its constant barrage of embarrassing antics seem to be turning off a significant portion of the American electorate. Since Trump’s inauguration last year, Republican candidates have […]

White rage: What is it leading to and where will it end?

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

Ever since the 2016 presidential election, there have been countless articles, theories, and commentators dissecting it. A level of white dissatisfaction, and, yes, even white rage, played a role in […]

Less stigma, more empathy for WIC families

by Sharisse Tracey

In my struggles as a single mom on a limited income, the Special Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) helped my family get by. The shame I felt […]

Supreme Court nominee will impact my life

by Elizabeth Fernandez

I really thought we’d have more time to plan our wedding. When my fiancée and I picked January 2019, it seemed far enough away to get everything done. Now, we’re […]

Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Willie Francois

Cutting “Food Stamps” is Child Abuse Every Sunday Jose “Frankie” Benjamin-Nay, an 18-year old Puerto Rican-American, darkens the doors of Mount Zion Baptist Church to provide technical support for the […]

Unarmed & Black: Keith Childress, Jr. remembered, and the growing list of loved ones left behind after police violence

by Nissa Tzun

Family, friends and supporters of police violence victim Keith Childress, Jr. demand justice for his murder. His mother, Jacqueline Lawrence, lives in Phoenix, Arizona, which makes advocating for her son difficult, but she has started to meet other families impacted by police violence.

Black Mothers Shouldn’t Have to Risk Death to Start A Family

by Mikka Macdonald

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released a study concluding that the rate of maternal mortality for mothers of color is rising — and that pregnant people […]

We are reliving one of America’s darkest moments by detaining immigrant children in former Japanese American Internment Camps

by Mikka Macdonald

When I first learned about how my grandparents were imprisoned in WWII’s Japanese American Internment Camps, I was embarrassed, hurt, and unwilling to accept history as truth.  Now ,as President […]

This housing experiment brought struggling seniors and young families together. Did it work?

by Bonnie Page

Genesis, means the beginning and the first. The community of Genesis was the brainchild of the nonprofit organization, MiCasa. It was planned as a purpose driven, intergenerational, affordable housing program, […]

Kindness can be America’s New Year’s Resolution

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

I look forward to every New Year because the annual trek symbolizes renewed hopes and dreams. But I have conflicted feelings over the winter months. I appreciate white Christmases, seeing […]

Floridians must come together in voting

by Topacio Marrero

The 2018 elections are crucial and we are uniting communities of color to cast their ballot for equality for all. I decided to walk around my neighborhood asking people if […]

Freedom is what moves him

by Maliha Kareem

In this upcoming elections, we have the chance to make history by voting YES to Amendment 4, which will restore the voting rights of over 1.5 million Floridians who have […]

Building Coalitions at the 2015 White House AAPI Youth Forum

by Angela Zhao

Last Thursday, July 9th, over 150 Asian American and Pacific Islander college students from across the nation convened at the White House for the 2015 White House Initiative on Asian […]

A political revolution is happening that will bring more Latino, black, women and young people out to vote

by Dorian Warren

We are deep into the political horse race season. Everyone is asking: Who’s pulling ahead? Who’s trailing? What’s the margin of error? Seems like every day there are new and […]

We as voters will determine the future of our country

by Will Holland

In 2016, decades of neglect on behalf of those in political authority caused a surge of bitterness and democratic participation on behalf of industrial workers in forgotten regions of both […]

Reminder to Congress: #Not1dollar for Trump’s racist wall

by Thomas Kennedy

The government shutdown that just ended was the longest in American history. Speaker Pelosi and Trump engaged in a war centered around Trump’s demand for $5.7 billion in funding for […]

Striking hotel workers: ‘One job should be enough’

by Catherine Bugayong

In October, hotel workers from across the country began a strike demanding higher wages, better healthcare, job stability and a host of other concerns. Several of them came to visit […]

“Take it to the bridge”

by Wendi C. Thomas

This article originally appeared on MLK50. MEMPHIS — July 10 marks the anniversary of the largest spontaneous act of civil disobedience in the city’s modern history. The spark: The police killings of […]

This Land is Our Land: Redefining “Outdoorsy”

by Mikka Macdonald

This Land Is Our Land is a series about diversity in the outdoors. You can read part one here and part two here.  Airfare to mountains: $800. Trekking gear: $900. Local lodging: […]

Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Tomicka Robinson

Roquesha Oneal is an everyday leader, a woman of fortitude and generosity. She resides in Detroit with her 15-year-old child with a disability and enjoys visits with her two adult […]

Everyday Leaders: Reflections after the 2019 Selma March

by Isaias G

“My name is Isaias and I am Undocumented and Unafraid.” This is the usual greeting for many undocumented immigrants in meetings to assert our presence. The whole room applauded in […]

Ideas of MLK, RFK still needed today

by Dorian Warren

This piece originally published in the Memphis Commercial Appeal. When President Lyndon B. Johnson launched the War on Poverty in 1964, his audacious goal was to end poverty in the […]

No papers. No fear. New House bill could create a road map for citizenship.

by Isaias G

More than two dozen immigrants chanted “Sin Papeles, Sin miedo, No Papers, No Fear” as they stood on the podium at the Capitol in DC before starting the press conference […]

A 23rd Birthday Commemorated Without Celebration, as Nevada Ranks Sixth in Police Killings Nationally

by Nissa Tzun

Las Vegas, Nev. – Monday, September 25th, 2018, would have been the 23rd birthday of Junior David Lopez. He was a young man with wedding plans set for mid-May and […]

How to stop another nightmare government shutdown

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

We – “we” meaning all Americans who still believe we are united as a nation that cares for our own – face an apocalyptic nightmare scenario. In Hollywood, the apocalypse […]

Supporting Food Entrepreneurs for Equity and Stronger Communities

by Christen Hill

We can strengthen our communities by creating food systems that create new jobs and businesses through the people living here. DREAM (Dreaming Out Loud’s Ready for Entrepreneurship Accelerator Modules) is […]

We Are Called to Deeply Listen to Those Impacted by Police Violence

by Nissa Tzun

Hearing families who have been impacted by police violence speak is always a transformative and powerful experience for me. While I have been working with impacted families since 2009, the […]

It’s time lawmakers listened: Access to clean water is a human right

by Mikka Macdonald

A few weeks ago, a contestant in the Miss America contest made headlines when she introduced herself by saying, “From the state with 84 percent of the United States’ fresh […]

Climate Voters Ready to Vote in November

by Laura Munoz

As a young child living in Colombia I lived through an earthquake. I am thankful to have been far from the epicenter of the shake in a well constructed structure, […]

As a social worker, my heart breaks for the children in our detention camps

by Cassandra Little

For 18 years, I worked in the Child Welfare System. I witnessed firsthand the trauma and harm children who were separated from their parents suffered from. Today, when I see […]

Report: Increasing Minimum Wage Saves Lives

by Fred McKissack Jr.

Tuesday’s “Day of Disruption” walkout by thousands of low-income workers underscores that the Fight for $15 movement is undeterred by the change of administration. Earlier this month, voters approved minimum-wage […]

Hay que Votar por Nuestra Salud

by Elizabeth Nazarett

Vivir diez años sin poder tener un seguro de salud fue realmente difícil. Durante ese tiempo, y como madre soltera con un salario modesto, debí escoger entre darle techo y […]

7 Lessons I learned from the Rust Belt and Appalachia

by Stephen Smith

I  am a community organizer in West Virginia. At the end of 2017,  I traveled for a week with friends and colleagues through Appalachia and the Rust Belt, seeking lessons […]

Nevada cannot relive its racist past

by Cassandra Little

I fear Nevada – and our entire country – is treading on its racist history.
Our president’s mantra is to “make America great again.” Many of us interpret this campaign slogan as a desire to return to the past, a time when White men ruled and White supremacists terrorized people of color.

Policing the Protesters

by Micaela Watts

This article originally appeared on MLK50. When the interim director of the Memphis Police Department linked arms with organizers of a protest that shut down traffic on the city’s Interstate […]

In the baddest of bad weeks, there is hope – but you gotta work for it

by Marisol Bello

I want to believe in the basic goodness of humans. That we love our family. That we choose kindness. That we lead with open minds and brave hearts and stand up to bullies who pick on those smaller or less powerful than them.

We Will Continue To Fight The Hate Deep In The Heart of Texas

by Thomas Kennedy

This article first appeared on the Huffington Post. In 2011, the Florida legislature attempted to pass an Arizona-style “show me your papers” law at the behest of Republican Governor Rick […]

Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Wandra Green

What Kansas City Is Doing About The Readiness Gap “Approximately 65 percent of our children are not receiving the proper education that would close the readiness gap and eliminate any […]

It Is Easier to Have a ‘Spirited’ Child When You Are a White Parent

by Stephanie Land

Originally published on The Guardian.  I have what’s known as a “spirited” child. Mia has run me ragged since she knew how to walk. She’d run across soccer fields as […]

Our Vote is Our Power: Why Every Voter Matters

by Mikka Macdonald

Voter turnout is one of the most powerful tools to measure the health of democracy because it relays how much trust voters have in the system that elects the people […]

Health care is our right

by Mikka Macdonald

In mid-August, a woman named Elena Hung testified on Capitol Hill to share how Republican attacks on our health care are putting her four-year-old daughter’s life at risk. “How can […]

Thistle and Bee offers dignity, livable wage to women leaving local sex economy

by Melonee Gaines

Vulnerable women get a second chance to build a life on their terms creating healthy, healing products

Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Ayanna Albertson

#safetyis reproductive freedom! When my friend told me she was having an abortion It wasn’t for me to give approval To grant permission To give my blessing or the opposite […]

The Assassination of Martin Luther King, and America’s Addiction to Gun Violence

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

April 4. The date of MLK’s assassination returns – as it always does to haunt us. April 4th, 1968 remains a guilty shadow lingering over American history. King is honored […]

Immigrant justice and criminal justice reform go hand-in-hand

by Thomas Kennedy

In the Trump era, efforts to curtail the aggressive criminalization of immigrant communities have largely focused on the fight over sanctuary cities. Sanctuary cities are localities that welcome immigrants and […]

Continuing Robert F. Kennedy’s legacy, 50 years later

by Stephanie Land

What does a man born into extreme wealth and privilege and a golden political pedigree have in common with a single mom from Montana who is struggling to get by? […]

Immigrants make their voices heard in Florida’s capitol

by Thomas Kennedy

Last week, over three hundred immigrants and other community members mobilized to Florida’s capitol in Tallahassee to defend and protect our communities from Republican lawmakers who are once again attempting to pass […]

Separating children from parents continues America’s painful history of criminalizing immigrants

by Mikka Macdonald

Toddlers crying after they are torn from their parents’ arms. Mothers, sitting in chainmail cages, using foil blankets for warmth. A father who committed suicide after being separated from his […]

Saving Nevada’s water from climate change impact: Eldemerdash

by Nadia Eldemerdash

The piece was published originally in the Reno Gazette Journal. Living in the desert, water is always on our minds – how to stay hydrated, how to manage it and […]

Voting to protect our families is not a privilege; it’s a necessity.

by Kica Matos

There is a line in the opening scene of Goethe’s play Faust that reads, “A man sees in the world what he carries in his heart.” It is a sentiment […]

Why Good Jobs Are Needed in the Food Stamp Debate

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

Originally published on Equal Voice.  It’s already begun happening. In 2016, 500,000 to 1 million recipients will be officially cut from the “food stamp” rolls. Some reports say it could […]

With payday loan , Trump again shows he’s not out to help the working class. He’s out to get them.

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

During his campaign, and again and again since becoming president, the Tweeter-in-Chief has brashly portrayed himself as “a populist,” a protector of the working class. His style, his rhetoric, and […]

Darkest Before the Dawn

by Rudy Lopez

Originally posted on Fox News Latino. Rudy Lopez, Senior Organizer at the Fair Immigration Reform Movement, participated as a core faster in the Fast for Families: A Call for Immigration […]

Use your right to vote to put people in office that have our best interest in mind

by Maliha Kareem

Young people are organized and highly motivated to make a difference this year towards an inclusive Florida. Students like Brandon Dasent are changing the political landscape. Although Dasent won’t be […]

Florida voters share concerns on the future of the Supreme Court

by Laura Munoz

Justice Anthony M. Kennedy recently announced that he will be retiring from the U.S. Supreme Court, the highest tribunal in the nation that rules on equal justice under law and […]

Ban the Box

by Tamika Middleton

This post was originally published on Creative Loafing Atlanta. Asking former prisons about past conviction history on job applications is a barrier to re-entry Every week, men and women who […]

We Need to Rethink the Role of Police in Our Lives

by Wendi C. Thomas

Photo credits to B. C. Lorio. Originally posted on The Huffington Post.  It was only a matter of time before actor activist Jesse Williams‘ all-the-way woke speech on BET the last […]

How Much Must Someone Suffer before You Start to Care?

by Amanda Sands

Recently I came across this op-ed in Forbes written by opinion columnist and perpetually miffed white man Tim Worstall. In what was supposed to be a half-quippy, half-snippy critique of a […]

Learning Black History Is Learning American History

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

Pride in Black history must be a national pride, not exclusive to African Americans

My Multiracial Son Embraces His Black Identity

by Fred McKissack Jr.

Originally published by the Indianapolis Star.  The wispy-haired 4-month-old Mark is held timeless in a frame in front of me. The 12-year-old, shaggy-haired Mark is fast asleep in the room […]

Save SNAP

by Christen Hill

In two underserved DC communities, there are only three groceries stores to serve 148,000 people.

Bold ideas rooted in the lives, experiences of real people

by Center for Community Change

Now you can check out some of the discussions from the event and hear for yourself how power and agency are at the root of economic justice for our communities.

Home Alone: A Single Mother Tries to Navigate Missoula’s Child Care Crisis

by Stephanie Land

Photo Credits to Brian Hart. Originally published by the Missoula Independent. My life as a single mother has often meant looking up, helpless, waving goodbye like Wile E. Coyote, after […]

What Happens When You Can’t Afford Self-care

by Stephanie Land

Originally published on Talk Poverty. For the last year, I have been keenly aware of my dire need for two things: therapy and exercise. But for those who struggle to […]

Black Lives Matter Movement and Opportunities Deprived Go Hand In Hand

by Fred McKissack Jr.

Originally published on Equal Voice.  What does it say about the value of Black lives when too many of those lives are in crumbling schools, drinking poisoned water, finding themselves […]

The Power of the Green New Deal

by Mikka Macdonald

When Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez first released her plan to combat climate change and build the economy, I was sitting at the edge of my bed, exhausted. I had been waiting […]

Cyntoia Brown case reveals entrenched problems with Tennessee juvenile justice

by Demetria Frank

State law makes it easier to throw Brown away than consider traumas youth face and offer them hope of rehabilitation

Saying Your House is Messy Because You Play With Your Kids is a Privilege

by Stephanie Land

Originally published in the Washington Post. I grew up in what some would call an immaculately clean home. I hated my mom a little for it. I wasn’t allowed to […]

Working Families’ Lives Matter

by Tamika Middleton

For the past several weeks, cities across the country have seen a multitude of protests and acts of civil disobedience following announcements that police officers would not be indicted in […]

The Austin Bomber case shows we are quick to label POCs, but not whites, when they do wrong

by Thomas Kennedy

Photo credit: Ted Eytan, Flickr Creative Commons   The citizens of Austin were terrorized by a series of bombings that left two people dead, and injuring others. The suspect ultimately blew […]

No more #EmptyPlatesEmptyPromises

by Marisol Bello

More than 60 mom, dads, seniors and people with disabilities delivered empty plates to the Washington, D.C. office of Texas House Rep. Mike Conaway, author of the Farm Bill, to […]

Our Vote is Our Power: A Brief History of Voting Rights in America

by Mikka Macdonald

The United States’ history of voting rights is full of contradictions and marks some of our highest aspirations and greatest injustices. It is a winding story of a democratic nation […]

Yes, Food Can Be Entertainment for Low-Income People

by Stephanie Land

Photo source: FreeImages.com Originally published on Talk Poverty.  I woke up yesterday hungry. Since my last shopping trip four days before, I’d not eaten much, saving most of the food […]

Back to School With TRIO Programs

by Stephanie Land

Originally published on ESME.  Reentering college as a nontraditional student takes a lot of courage, especially as an older woman with kids. I received my bachelor’s degree at 35 and […]

‘Ain’t Got No Wiggle Room’

by Deepak Bhargava

Originally published on the new blog TalkPoverty.org. Poverty is everywhere. More than one in three Americans—106 million people—live below or perilously close to the federal poverty line. If you pick […]

Monster in the Mission

by Mark Ortiz

This piece was originally posted on The Huffington Post San Francisco. “The only public housing this city provides is county jails,” Bilal Ali of the Coalition Against Homelessness said at […]

Keepers of memory: Remembering Trayvon Martin

by Jamilah Sabur

This year marks the sixth year since the death of Trayvon Martin, and I do not want us to forget. Six years and we find ourselves living in an America with a president who has been endorsed by white nationalists and a country more divided than ever.

En la Florida los votantes estan activos por Gillum

by Elizabeth Nazarett

En la Florida los votantes estan bien activos. Este 6 de noviembre muchos dicen que van a unir el voto por Andrew Gillum para gobernador. Dicen que van a votar […]

Immigration Is Still On the List

by Alesia Lucas

President Obama’s second term has no shortage of key issues. While some feared that the important issue of gun control and the debt ceiling would overshadow the need for comprehensive […]

After Trump’s fake deadline on Dreamers passes, immigrant youth still in limbo

by Thomas Kennedy

In the aftermath of the Parkland shooting, the focus of lawmakers has largely shifted from finding a solution for the thousands of Dreamers who have been left under threat of […]

How Far We’ve Come

by Anton Conkle

You can hear the awe and disbelief in the now infamous and chilling 911 calls from residents of Sanford, FL. In essence, they capture the moments in which a 17 […]

Preserving the People’s Lakes

by Fred McKissack Jr.

Slashing EPA initiative is shortsighted and dangerous

Who Are the ‘Legitimate’ Poor?

by Stephanie Land

Originally published on Talk Poverty. Recently, I disobeyed a cardinal rule of the Internet and decided to read comments on an article I once published in the Missoula Independent. I […]

Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Willie Francois

New Attacks on Healthcare from the Right are Wrong No one should have to choose between paying medical costs and exhibiting grandparental love when the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has […]

Congress continues to put our health care at risk

by Mikka Macdonald

Last year, cancer patient and Nevada resident Laura Packard asked her U.S. Senator why he was willing to sacrifice her life for corporate tax breaks. In a public event in […]

The Poverty Predicament

by Alesia Lucas

The word ‘poor’ is treated like a four-letter word by politicians. But with the downturn of our economy and slow job market, the issue of poverty has become more serious […]

Everywhere I Look, There Are Caregivers

by Donna DeLaCruz

This week a new campaign was launched called “Give A Care”.  The idea is simple: thank the people in your life who are caregivers by sending them a personalized video.  […]

Food Stamps And Child Care Go Hand In Hand For Families

by Sharisse Tracey

On July 31, President Trump boasted about the state of the economy, specifically the stock market, and how it is at its highest point in a number of years. What […]

Hollywood empowerment: From Coco to Black Panther to Crazy Rich Asians

by Karl Catarata

This piece was originally published in AndACTION. These past few months, Latinx family pride and Black excellence dominated Hollywood with the blockbuster releases of “Coco” and “Black Panther.” And now, […]

Children in Poverty

by Robin Curran

Following the release of the 2012 Census data, perhaps the most disturbing statistics are those that relate to children. The results show that about one in five children in the […]

East Haven’s Dirty Little Secret Exposed

by Anton Conkle

People were stunned when they heard that East Haven, Connecticut Mayor Joseph Maturo said he “might have tacos” in response to a question about what he was going to do […]

Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Willie Francois

Why Does America Celebrate Mother’s Day Given Its Treatment of Poor Mothers? Another Mother’s Day has come and gone! School-age children with sharp grins delivered to their mothers their hand-made […]

Gillum will protect Floridians’ access to health care

by Elizabeth Nazarett

Gillum will protect Floridians’ access to health care Health care is a top priority for Florida voters this November. We all know someone who has health concerns—and every day we […]

Unite the Vote for the Vote!

by Laura Munoz

“The basic elements so vital to Negro advancement can only be achieved by seeking redress from government at local, state and federal levels. To do this the vote is essential,” […]

Congress must move quickly on immigration

by Kica Matos

What does it take to get Congress to listen? On April 10, more than 100,000 people from 31 states descended on the nation’s Capitol to send a strong message that […]

Women of Color Finding Their Voice

by Alesia Lucas

In 2012, women still find it hard to make their voices heard. Remember the all-white, all-male congressional panel debating women’s contraception earlier this year? For women of color, it is […]

Art Gives Voice To Young People Hurt By Trump’s Deportation Machine

by Thomas Kennedy

This article first appeared in the Huffington Post. Growing up undocumented, one of my biggest fears was being separated from my family. I remember the anxiety and worry I felt […]

With $55,000 Debt, You Learn to Appreciate the Little Things

by Stephanie Land

Originally posted on The Guardian as a kick-off to their series on debt. I expected college to feel like a major accomplishment. I walked across the stage, eight months pregnant with […]

Building the Economic Strength of Women

by Alesia Lucas

March 8th is International Women’s Day, and although it’s 2013, American women still lag behind men in paycheck fairness. Women still make a mere 64 cents for every dollar their […]

Why I Give to CCC

by Kyle Simpson

After reading a New York Times op-ed by Arthur C. Brooks in which he discusses why he enjoys fund-raising, I began to think about why I give money to the […]

Want to win in 2020? Focus on child care!

by Carmella Salinas and Tameka Ramsey

The evidence is clear: the lack of affordable and accessible child care is drowning America’s working families. A 2018 poll by the Center for American Progress and Community Change found […]

There’s Too Much On the Line to Skip This Election

by Elizabeth Fernandez

With so much at stake in this election, in Florida and across the nation, registering to vote before the Oct. 9th deadline is so important. That’s why former First Lady […]

CHOICES chooses a $15/hour living wage

by Wendi C. Thomas

Raising base pay of all employees is ‘just a matter of priorities’ at Memphis reproductive health care organization

Free-Range Parenting Is A Privilege For The White And Affluent

by Stephanie Land

Photo credits to Ryan Dickey.  Originally published in The Establishment.  At first glance, my 9-year-old daughter doesn’t look “poor.” She meticulously chooses her outfits for school, often sleeping in them—even […]

‘My Family Does Not Struggle Because We Lack Work Ethic’

by Laffon Brelland, Jr.

This piece was originally published on TalkPoverty.org. Living in a single-parent household is tough. I grew up with my mother and two sisters, and although my mother always worked, we […]

We Could Have Avoided The Deaths Of The Undocumented Immigrants In Texas

by Thomas Kennedy

This article initially appeared on the Huffington Post. When my parents came to the United States almost two decades ago, they did not think that they would spend all those […]

Florida makes history as Amendment 4 goes into effect

by Thomas Kennedy

Today is a historic day for Florida. The most significant voting rights act in the state’s history and the most significant expansion of the franchise since the civil rights act […]

The families left behind after police killings share their stories in multimedia series, Residuum

by Nissa Tzun

Despite the mainstream media attention excessive-use-of-force cases has received over the last several years, family and community voices are not uplifted and often overlooked, while the police department’s story is always the official narrative in a fatality involving themselves. Residuum is a vignette series highlighting the aftermath of police killings through the experiences of the victims’ families.  

The Art of Balancing the Ledger While in Poverty

by Stephanie Land

Originally published on Talk Poverty and CommonDreams.  When you live at or under the federal poverty level, you’d better be good at crunching numbers. Every cent coming in or going […]

Pessimistic Prospects of a 20-Something: Scenes From a Job Fair

by Julia Clunn

No one is untouched by the economic problems our country currently faces. At the very least we all know someone who has been foreclosed on, have a family member who […]

We Are Unafraid. We are #HereToStay.

by Cristina Rayas

Call 1-866-575-9410 to tell Speaker Paul Ryan to stand with immigrants and pass DREAM Act legislation that provides a permanent solution for dreamers without adding money to Trump’s deportation force.

#WeEndPIC – We End the Prison Industrial Complex

by Olivia Chow

Last week, the Center for Community Change, in partnership with Nation Inside, gathered more than 100 activists in Detroit for a national strategy meeting to end mass incarceration. Below is […]

Women Arrested for Kavanaugh-Related Protest at Manchin’s Office

by Bobbi Dempsey

  Despite being led into the street in the middle of the night in handcuffs, a West Virginia woman says speaking up on behalf of sexual assault survivors like herself […]

Bradford and Anthony: Married Seven Years, Facing Deportation

by Debbie Weiss

Bradford Wells and Anthony Makk have been together for 19 years and seven years ago they were legally married in Massachusetts.  Despite the fact that they have been together for […]

A Hurricane Is Never An Excuse To Mock The Poor

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

I remember. I remember because I will always love New Orleans. All the residents of the Gulf Coast, or anyone who loved New Orleans – and who was old enough to remember August 29th, 2005 – has mourned the day ever since.

A Holiday Without Your Parents

by Alesia Lucas

Many US children will spend this holiday season without a parent. Why? Because they have a parent who isn’t a US citizen and has been deported. From 2010-2012 about 23% […]

Underserved communities find no relief as water rates increase

by Jiquanda Johnson

Tia Simpson stood in front of nearly 40 journalists pleading her case for clean and affordable water. The 34-year-old Flint resident endured the aftermath of being exposed to the city’s […]

The Thing “Joe the Plumber” Doesn’t Seem To Understand about Racism

by Amanda Sands

At the risk of giving too much attention to back-burner ideologue “Joe the Plumber,” I want to bring up something in his recent blog post: “Wanting a white Republican president […]

The Answer is Muhammad Ali: Who else?

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

Originally published in the Huffington Post. For most of my life, I haven’t idolized sports heroes. I may be the exception to the great American male rule-of-thumb. There have been […]

Financial Literacy Provides a Way Out for Abuse Survivors

by Loryn Wilson

Trigger Warning: This piece includes references to domestic violence and other forms of abuse. One in four women will experience domestic abuse in her lifetime. Abuse comes in many forms, but […]

Universal pre-K won’t solve poverty. Better jobs will.

by Wendi C. Thomas

Memphis council members promote politically safe investment in children while ignoring underpaid parents

Hands that Help, not Hold

by Zachary Langway

If Monday’s theme at the Social Good Summit was storytelling, then Tuesday’s theme was empowerment.  There were some fantastic speakers talking about the tools we now have, online and offline, […]

Tundra Episode 1: Cold Journey to Justice

by Jeremiah Chapman

TUNDRA: Cold Journey to Justice is a docu-series that captures the cold climate found in marginalized communities across the U.S.

Little Girls Are Busting Gender Norms in a Year That Hasn’t Been Super Kind to Women

by Fred McKissack Jr.

Photo credit: Aberdeen Proving Ground via Flickr Creative Commons Originally published on The Huffington Post.   In our Fort Wayne neighborhood, Halloween is a serious candy free-for-all. We bought 12 […]

For The Homeless, Getting Through The Holidays Is The Toughest Season

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

You can’t enter the Interfaith Community Shelter of Santa Fe, New Mexico with plans to spend the night unless you undergo a pat down. Empty your pockets. Stretch your arms […]

College Food Banks: A Growing Necessity

by Robin Curran

Many have heard of the typical college diet of ramen noodles and pizza, and the struggle for students away at school to eat well. But beyond simply a problem of […]

A Primer on the Protest Sign

by Alison Stine

I have glitter in the floorboards of my house, paint on every item of clothing I own, no matter how “new,” and am secretly happy every time my son has […]

A Bus Tour, Full of Stories and Strength

by Emily Gelbaum

Last week, the National Keeping Families Together Bus Tour launched from Chicago, IL carrying families and individuals directly impacted by the current immigration system. The bus riders are calling on […]

A New Way to Empower

by Tori O'Neal

In recent weeks, the Center for Community Change has been testing our new vision for “scale with soul,” attempting to reach thousands of Americans who have not been reached before; […]

Our Homeless Vets

by Annie-Rose Strasser

A new report (.pdf) out this week from the Government Accountability office examines the number of homeless female veterans, and the numbers are astounding: “Limited VA data show the number […]

Jobs, Justice and the American Dream

by Zachary Langway

The following remarks were delivered by Arlene Holt Baker, Executive Vice President of the AFL-CIO and a Center for Community Change board member, at today’s symposium, “Jobs, Justice and the […]

Sheryl Sandberg Thinks She Finally Gets Single Moms, But She Doesn’t Get Me

by Stephanie Land

Originally posted in SheKnows. I read Sheryl Sandberg’s recent Facebook post from the trenches of a horrible Mother’s Day weekend. The youngest had thrown up on Friday night, and we […]

Jim Crow lives in Nevada’s elections

by Cassandra Little

Several weeks ago, a gentleman came to a Progressive Leadership Alliance Nevada (PLAN) meeting and asked for help restoring his right to vote. After 12 years, he was now eligible, […]

What is your vision for the future? Families Call for Unity

by Catherine Bugayong

Calling for an end to family detention, FIRM Action and CASA in Action united the voices of people from across the country in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday. What is your […]

SNAP works and so should Congress

by Marcia Dinkins

WASHINGTON D.C.—  The Center for Community Change hosted a partners and leaders convening to discuss strategies and to develop collective actions opposing the harmful cuts proposed in the Farm Bill, […]

Memphis Sanitation Workers, on MLK Legacy and the Road to Dignity

by Christen Hill

50 years later, sanitation workers say ‘If MLK was living today, he would be ashamed of the way Memphis treats its sanitation workers.’

The Starbucks incident highlights the daily indignities that Black people face

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

A good friend of mine commented on his Facebook page about the now viral video of the “Starbucks arrest incident,” which showed two black men being arrested in a Philadelphia Starbucks […]

Mr. President: We don’t Need Gestures; We Need Action to Ban the Box

by Steve Huerta

Earlier this week the President announced that his office was issuing a memorandum to Ban the Box for federal employment. What followed was an explosion of jubilant articles that once […]

“I believe that we will win!”

by Tamika Middleton

At 7:30 am, about 100 airport people marched into the atrium of the world’s busiest airport chanting, “We can’t survive on $7.25.” The crowd got bigger as they rallied, with […]

Young voters in Florida state why they are voting this November

by Elizabeth Fernandez

I’m speaking to voters at a candidate forum for young voters in Miami on why the November 2018 elections matter to them. Check them out. Be inspired. Let’s unite the […]

What the President Should Learn from Joe

by Annie-Rose Strasser

Late last night, Obama administration officials  announced that they’re willing to cut Social Security—along with more cuts to Medicare—to reach a deal on the budget. Let’s be honest. Retirement security […]

How do we work to redeem America’s soul?

by Raphael Warnock

This piece originally published in the Atlanta Journal Constitution. From the recent, unabashed public expressions of white supremacy to immoral policies of ripping immigrant children away from their parents to […]

Fast Food CEO Blames Low-Wage Workers for Poverty

by Deepak Bhargava

This piece was originally published on TalkPoverty.org. To be “poor” in America isn’t an identifying characteristic or a defining trait, like being forgetful or creative or tall. Being a low-income […]

Getting our priorities straight on mass incarceration and perpetuated poverty

by Robin Curran

Connection between mass incarceration and perpetuated poverty, why it’s bad not only for individuals but also for communities Did you know that the U.S. imprisons more of its citizens than […]

Puerto Ricans Fleeing Island May Change Florida’s Political Landscape

by Maliha Kareem

Florida is home to over 1.13 million Boricuas, 70% of whom tend to vote Democrat. This is why coming November, Boricuas who previously lived on the island but were unable […]

Caregiving: One Family’s Story

by Ashley Ferguson

I come from a large extended family that steps up when one of us needs help. When my grandmother had a stroke and my great aunt began losing her sight, […]

Jobs Not Jails

by Olivia Chow

Last week, through the cold and the rain, the Jobs Not Jails coalition sent a strong message to their state of Massachusetts—redirect $2 billion for new prison beds to a […]

To the Women Who Are Afraid

by Alison Stine

Photo credits to Nshepard via Flickr Creative Commons. Originally published on MomsRising.  There’s a nagging suspicion inside you that something is wrong. He calls you names. He denies your feelings. He […]

Can We Really Do Something about Poverty in America?

by Deepak Bhargava

Executive Director Deepak Bhargava delivered the following speech on July 1, 2014 at the Aspen Ideas Fest. For the full video of Deepak delivering this speech, click here. In the richest […]

Trump’s War on Families Intensifies

by Thomas Kennedy

After a 17-year journey, my parents will no longer be undocumented. This was no easy feat to accomplish, I lived 11 of those years without papers along with them, and […]

Alabama Is The Perfect Test Case For Empowering Black And Brown Voters

by Thomas Kennedy

Democrat Doug Jones managed to accomplish last week what conventional wisdom thought impossible when he defeated the GOP candidate Roy Moore, an alleged pedophile and bigot, to become the next […]

The Fight for Quality, Accessible Child Care is a Fight for Women’s Equality

by Wendi C. Thomas

This piece was originally posted in the Montgomery Advertiser. Women’s History Month is about more than celebrating phenomenal women in history; it’s also about honoring the women who have dedicated […]

Sharing the Stories of Immigrant Families

by Alesia Lucas

The Fair Immigration Reform Movement recently launched the Keeping Families Together Campaign. The campaign was created to advocate for immigration reform that keeps families together and to collect the stories […]

Residuum: What Really Happened at the Fatal Police Stop That Took Her Fiance

by Nissa Tzun

Pulled over for speeding, her fiance did not survive the traffic stop. Amber Bustillos is challenging the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department’s official narrative of Junior Lopez’s homicide.

We need people of color to vote: Here’s how.

by Thomas Kennedy

Voting is the most basic and important right an individual has in a democracy. As voters, we elect people to represent our communities and if a majority of voters do […]

They didn’t vote in the primaries, but with Gillum, they are now inspired to vote

by Topacio Marrero

There has been much excitement in the state of Florida involving the 2018 primaries and its candidates. For example, in Broward County, it was estimated more than 23.5 percent of […]

How to live with racism in times like these

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

This week marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King. And it is making me even more reflective of what it means to be black at […]

Fighting to Keep History from Repeating

by John Tejeda

This year marks the 47th anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery Civil Rights march. The 50-mile trek along what is now known as the Voting Rights Trail marked an important […]

Americans Pay The Price When Our Political Institutions Erode

by Thomas Kennedy

This article first appeared on the Huffington Post. It is said that compromise is the cornerstone of democracy. If that is indeed the case, American democracy is seriously faltering. The […]

Florida Petition Seeks to Restore Voting Rights of 1.5 Million People

by Thomas Kennedy

The state must do all it can to enfranchise its citizens and expand democracy for all.

Just Because I’m Poor Doesn’t Mean My Kid Shouldn’t Have Nice Things

by Stephanie Land

Originally published on She Knows.  My daughter and I were living in a conservative area when I started to notice an outcry to test people receiving public assistance for drug […]

Hiding in plain sight

by Fred McKissack Jr.

Hidden Figures is a treasure, but we need to dig deeper in finding new talent

Making Minimum Wage a Living Wage

by Alesia Lucas

Overall, 77% of those who watched The State of the Union Address were pleased with what the President had to say.  It was a passionate plea and directive to the […]

The Heart and Soul of Getting Out the Vote

by Emily Gelbaum

During a site visit to Chicago to work with the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights (ICIRR) as part of my electoral work with the Campaign for Community Change, […]

An Awards Ceremony Worth Watching

by Donna DeLaCruz

The Emmy Awards were recently handed out and as usual, the biggest news was who was wearing what. And as usual, the TV ratings were dismal. Well, last night I […]

Come Join ‘Job’s for #Young America Day’ on the Hill

by Megan Salzman

Are you one of the many youth who is unemployed and frustrated with our nation’s high unemployment levels? If so, then this is the event for you! The Young Invincibles, […]

It’s time to talk about reparations

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

The idea of reparations are back in the news with the 2020 Democratic candidates, raising the issue of offering some form of payment to black Americans for the horrors inflicted […]

Anatomy of a Veto

by Gary Sandusky

Gary Sandusky is a Senior Field Organizer at the Center for Community Change. In 2009, Center for Community Change assigned me to work closely with the Alliance for a Just […]

PUSH!

by Deirdra Reed

This blog was originally published on MomsRising.org.  When my sister-in-law was pregnant with her first child, she drove me crazy, calling me at all hours to tell me about every little […]

Progress in the Fight for the Right to Call Home

by Olivia Chow

Yesterday, the Federal Communications Commission took a major step towards honoring human empathy by issuing a statement to reduce the cost of phone calls made from prisons, jails and other […]

The Life-Long Stigma of Being an Ex-Prisoner

by Abby Marco

We like to think that in the United States, all people have rights and equality; all people have a voice. However, there are 65 million Americans and 60,000 D.C. natives […]

Almost 1 Million Immigrant Youths Are Realizing The American Dream. Don’t Steal It From Them, Trump.

by Marcella Vitulli

DACA has allowed DREAMers, who were brought to this country as children, to be spared from deportation while also allowing them to work and attend college.

Xenophobia is not foreign to America

by Mikka Macdonald

After the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, advertisements for “Jap Hunting Licenses” hung in store windows. Life Magazine ran the article, “How to tell your friends from the Japs.” […]

A Year of Fighting for our Families and Friends

by Cristina Rayas

The Center for Community Change, in its work with the Fair Immigration Reform Movement (FIRM), has been standing steadfast against attacks against our family and friends. Even in the face of Trump’s non-stop barrage of hateful immigration policies, FIRM and its members did not hide in the shadows. FIRM members showed up countless times this year at rallies, at Congressional offices, held hunger strikes and never let their voices be silenced. And we are determined to continue to push forward in the year ahead.

Bobby and the Center for Community Change

by Jeff Parcher

I still recall the moment that I truly entered the world. It was not the instant when the bullets were fired. It was a few minutes later when I was […]

Alone on Valentine’s Day Because Of Deportation

by Alesia Lucas

In December the Fair Immigration Reform Movement launched the Keeping Families Together campaign, the campaign collects the countless stories of families split because of our broken immigration system. Yesterday was […]

Peter Edelman talks, “So Rich, So Poor: Why It’s So Hard to End Poverty in America”

by Alesia Lucas

Peter Edelman sat down with Democracy Now! to discuss his new book, “So Rich, So Poor: Why It’s So Hard to End Poverty in America.” Currently, one in every two […]

CCC celebrates 50 years: Change is coming for the next 50 years

by Cristina Rayas

At the center of our stories is change. Some change, we decide for ourselves …

A Worker’s Take On The New Overtime Proposal

by Wendi C. Thomas

Originally posted on Talk Poverty and The Nation. As a manager for a national auto supply chain, Lora McCrary puts in between 50 and 70 hours a week remodeling stores […]

Reparations well-intentioned, but insufficient for the debt owed

by Wendi C. Thomas

This article originally appeared on MLK50. On Thursday, the city of Memphis announced it would pay what can only be described as reparations for decades of shorting the retirement funds […]

I Hosted a Meeting… What’s Next?

by Annie-Rose Strasser

So now that you have hosted a successful American Dream House Meeting, what should you do next? With all of the great information and ideas you gathered, there are a […]

GOP Lawmakers Could Not Be Bothered To Read Their Own Health Care Bill

by Thomas Kennedy

Seriously? They voted on a bill that would hurt 24 million Americans, but that they never actually read?

We’re Building a Boisterous, Energized Movement

by Kate Casa

Building strength from the grass roots. It’s what the Center for Community Change (CCC) has done for 45 years. It’s what we will continue to do in 2014 as we […]

As Medicaid Cuts Loom, Disability Advocates Fear the Worst

by Micaela Watts

This article originally appeared on MLK50. For low-income people with disabilities, a straightforward mission like finding the right wheelchair can be a long-fought battle. More complex needs, such as acquiring […]

Dems Don’t Get A Pass When It Comes To Black And Brown People. We Deserve More From All Of Our Elected Leaders.

by Helen Li

In 2017, the campaign for Virginia governor elect Ralph Northam estimates that canvassers knocked on almost 4 million doors, almost twice the number of doors knocked for the Clinton campaign […]

Why Aren’t Florida Officers Being Punished For ‘Boiling’ Darren Rainey To Death In Scalding Shower?

by Thomas Kennedy

Imagine being a prison inmate, jailed for drug possession charges, and being thrown into a scalding hot shower for hours that leads to a tortuous death. That’s what happened to […]

Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Jody Ellis

My longtime boyfriend, always the carnivore, asked me the other day why I hardly ever make meatloaf. I shrugged and said “You know I don’t really eat meat.” “But your […]

My Family’s Curse

by Jamal Meneide

When thinking about the American dream, we often believes that merit in equals results out—if you work hard enough, you deserve what you get. But is that always the case? […]

The Most Important Election Of Your Life

by Thomas Kennedy

This piece originally published in FloridaPolitics.com. Every election it seems like we are told that it’s the most important election of our lifetime. We as voters hear this line so […]

Immigration and LGBT Advocates

by Alesia Lucas

When two Portland women renewed their vows in Oregon, living as a mixed-status couple, the moment was impactful for more than one reason.  The couple renewed their vows to illustrate […]

Three-Strikes and You’re In: The Unconstitutionality of the Three-Strikes Law

by Angela Zhao

The Supreme Court has been cranking out hit after hit of rulings that show signs of our progress as a nation that views Americans as human beings: as ones who […]

Putting good jobs at top of US policy agenda

by Allie Carter

This post originally appeared here.  Even though she’s worked at the Checkers in Lincoln Park for four years, Mya Hill is still paid only $8.15 an hour – Michigan’s minimum […]

We Can’t Survive on $7.25

by Tamika Middleton

This piece originally appeared on TalkPoverty.org. At 6 a.m. last Thursday, a small group of people gathered at the Burger King on the corner of North Avenue and Hunt Street in […]

Out of Homelessness, A Mom Turns Advocate

by Fred McKissack Jr.

Originally published on Rooflines, a Shelterforce blog. Jenean F. and her husband worked hard to achieve the increasingly elusive American Dream. She was a stay at home mom and he […]

Missouri Athletes Bust Through Intolerance

by Fred McKissack Jr.

Originally published by The Progressive.  With the walk-out that led to the resignation of a university president and chancellor, the University of Missouri’s black football players showed their power to […]

Not In Our Town National Week of Action: Communities Stand Together Against Hate

by Debbie Weiss

Not In Our Town: Light in the Darkness airs on PBS  September 21. Join communities across the country who are using a new PBS documentary to find ways to prevent hate […]

American Racism: Charlottesville Provides Another Example Of The Never-ending ‘Here We Go Again’

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

For as long as millions of whites choose to let their voices remain muted, silence remains complicity.

Improving Social Security to Enhance Economic Security for Vulnerable Populations

by Amanda Sands

With 82 percent of Americans in agreement that we must increase Social Security benefits even if it means raising taxes, why should we wait any longer to improve our Social […]

Hunger in America Deprives Everyone in America

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

There is a tradition in fairytales and various old fashioned yarns which I’ve seen over the years that a hungry person will dream of lavish meals, roast beef and mutton, […]

1863: A conversation with Jen Meccozzi, “I went through it, balls hard.”

by Stephen Smith

Jen Meccozzi tells her story of going from angry parent to organizer to school board member.  

How One Late Paycheck Messed Up My Life

by Sharisse Tracey

I know at a deep level that my family lived paycheck to paycheck. A check comes in. We pay our bills. We have no savings to speak of. But it […]

Why I Fasted

by Emily Gelbaum

Last Wednesday, March 19th, I participated in the Women’s Fast for Families, a national fast organized by We Belong Together, in which women choose 24 hours to fast for immigration reform. At […]

Reflections from Selma

by Tamika Middleton

Savannah Williams remembers where she was on March 7, 1965. “When Bloody Sunday happened, “ she explained, “I was at my first job working for the United States Department of Agriculture […]

The New Female Face of the $10 Bill

by Olivia Chow

Treasury Secretary Jack Lew has announced that a to-be-determined woman will be pushing Alexander Hamilton from the focal point of the $10 in 2020. This will be the first bill […]

Black Lives Matter Less Even in Drug Addiction

by Fred McKissack Jr.

Originally published on the Huffington Post.  A heroin needle. Photo credits to Wheeler Cowperthwaite via Flickr Creative Commons. Even when it comes to drug addiction, black lives matter less. Consider […]

Keeping Families Together in our Fight for Immigration Reform

by Alesia Lucas

This year has been a huge one for DREAMers who earlier this year were granted deferred action status. But the fight for DREAMers is not over. Although they now have […]

Voting For The First Time At 71

by Alesia Lucas

The Campaign for Community Change is working with several groups in the field to register a record number of new voters for this year’s election. In the days leading up […]

Reno: Do we want to be the new Silicon Valley?

by Cassandra Little

Last month, I went to San Francisco with a group of friends to see a musical. While the play was fantastic, and we had a great time, I left feeling […]

Modern Freedom Riders for Immigrant Rights

by Zachary Langway

This is an exceprt from a commentary by our friend, Henry Fernandez, in “New America Media.” Fifty years ago this summer, hundreds of young people organized, rode buses into the […]

EDGE Board signs off on Overton Square Hotel incentives

by Wendi C. Thomas

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — The Shelby County EDGE board signed off on tax incentives for a boutique hotel in Overton Square. The Economic Development Growth Engine signed off on $6.1 million […]

Language of Change

by Zachary Langway

Last night, after the longest leg of the Selma to Alabama march, hundreds of marchers, supporters, and community members gathered at a Catholic school in Montgomery. On each face, under […]

Elections are tight; margins are slim. That’s why the Asian American vote matters.

by Karl Catarata

Las Vegas – The Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) population in the United States is often forgotten about, underrepresented in politics, and often thought of as a minority group that […]

Real Social Change When People Rise Up and Demand It

by Deepak Bhargava

I’m angry and I’m frustrated. And perhaps like me, you don’t recognize the country you live in anymore. It’s not just the rabid partisan politics or the dour national mood […]

Champions for Change

by Zachary Langway

We all know change is hard. And it takes the hard work of people united across the nation, dedicated to changing the conditions that create poverty and inequity, and working […]

Frances Bean Cobain and the Graffiti of Privilege

by Alison Stine

A friend saw it, driving in Los Angeles. A billboard for tony fashion line Marc Jacobs, featuring Frances Bean Cobain as the model, had been defaced with graffiti. And then […]

Midwest Grassroots Ambassadors Training Wraps Up with Raucus Macy’s Action

by Burke Stansbury

A group of 60 Grassroots Ambassadors and staff from three states came together from July 7-9 in Chicago, Illinois for a dynamic training and collective action. The Jane Addams Senior […]

‘Saturday Night Live’ Skit Has People Talking About Who and What Really is Dividing Us

by Wendi C. Thomas

Originally published by The Undefeated. Did a Saturday Night Live sketch last week hint at a future hard to envision in today’s bitter political climate — a future in which […]

In this battle over Muslim immigration, we are all family

by Wendi C. Thomas

Because of our history and heritage, black Americans should recognize the humanity in their struggle

Announcing, my forthcoming memoir: MAID: A Single Mother’s Journey from Cleaning House to Finding Home

by Stephanie Land

On June 16th, I celebrated my youngest daughter Coraline’s second birthday. While she opened presents, I relished the memory of her entering my life. She was born a month after […]

“Ban the Box,” Say Those In It: People Who Survive Prison Fight for Fair-Chance Hiring

by Angela Zhao

Millions of Americans who have been imprisoned will survive one box only to be confined by another, smaller yet even more damaging one. On July 14th, the President spoke at […]

Tale of Two Cities

by Wendi C. Thomas

This piece was originally published in The Memphis Flyer. Could Memphis be Baltimore? It’s impossible to watch coverage of Baltimore protests sparked by police brutality and not wonder: Could that […]

America the Beautiful

by Abby Marco

Coca-Cola’s infamous 2014 Superbowl ad, titled “It’s Beautiful,” proves a couple of things in its role as the most controversial commercial of the night. First of all, its rendition of […]

Standing Strong with Immigrants and Survivors

by Mikka Macdonald

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Investor deposits lessons in financial literacy, freedom for a new generation

by Wendi C. Thomas

Despite persistent barriers to black wealth building, Memphis-based fund manager Floyd Tyler says it can be done—and it is

Come Back to Art: How Creativity and Activism Intersect

by Alison Stine

This article first appeared on Equal Voice. I wasn’t trained in this. I didn’t go for school for this. Nobody pays me for this, and nobody expects me to be […]

Licensing Fairness

by Kris Kelkar

I don’t know what I would do without my driver’s license. Being from Los Angeles, I find driving to be an essential to getting my way around. But my license […]

Terror for Profit

by Ronnie Galvin

America made Dylann Storm Roof. His act of terrorism didn’t happen in isolation. He is the physical and present-day manifestation of a deeply-ingrained mindset that says white Americans are superior […]

Addressing San Francisco’s Housing Crisis Starts With Investing in Jobs

by Mark Ortiz

This piece originally appeared in The Huffington Post.  The first thing that struck me when I moved to the Bay Area three years ago was the extraordinary cost of rent. During […]

Engaging Direct Service Providers in Organizing: A Reflection

by Katy Heins

As a member of the New Organizing Practices’ direct service and organizing committee, I have been reflecting on whether service providers have a stronger relationship with the folks who use […]

Tired Feet but Refreshed Soul

by Rich Stolz

I was among the 200 people honored to retrace the first 12 miles of the Selma to Montgomery march Sunday and yesterday. My feet are tired but boy is my […]

Progress, But Not Victory

by Kris Kelkar

On Monday and Tuesday of last week, I was discouraged. The Supreme Court had ruled on cases dealing with affirmative action and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 – both […]

Law-enforcement Leaders Agree: State Anti-immigrant Laws Encourage Discrimination

by Ali Noorani

In our struggle to make a more perfect nation, the liberty of all Americans is at risk. On Wednesday, the Supreme Court of the United States is slated to hear […]

Medicaid Is Not An Entitlement For The Poor But A Gateway For Health And Sustainability

by Sharisse Tracey

This article originally appeared on the Huffington Post. Although for now, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has escaped the wrath of Republicans, they are still intent on making good on […]

When Enough Gets to Be Enough

by Tamika Middleton

This blog was originally posted on the Voices for Human Needs blog.  On Monday night, thousands of people marched through downtown Atlanta in the pouring rain.  Most of them I […]

Immigrant Rights Are Workers Rights

by Thomas Kennedy

Bad policies that harm working Americans continue to chip away at our aspirations to strive.

Representation, diversity, and the district

by Nadia Eldemerdash

Yvanna Cancela talks about her run for State Senate By Nadia Eldemerdash In some ways, it was serendipity that brought 30-year-old Yvanna Cancela to the Nevada State Senate in 2016. […]

Slavery by Any Other Name

by Gabe Gonzalez

When attempting to make structural change in America it is always important to begin by understanding the structures in question, how they got that way, and only then advocating solutions. […]

“Si, se puede”

by Abby Marco

A self-proclaimed “Born-Again Feminist,” Dolores Huerta, now 83, has been a prominent community organizer and civil rights activist for most of her life. Though, she is best known for co-founding […]

Hungry American Children

by Alesia Lucas

There have been a lot of speeches at both the Democratic and Republican Conventions, but only Jeff Bridges has spoken at both.  Unfortunately, Bridges speech will not garner the much […]

Grassroots Leaders, Politicians, the American People All Agree: It’s Time to Expand Social Security

by Angela Zhao

Although the White House Conference on Aging is held only once every ten years, Monday’s event was a crucial time to address issues for older Americans, especially as they retire […]

Which America do We Live In?

by John Tejeda

Is this still the land of the free and the home of the brave, or do we now live in a country that tears families apart and drives children from […]

The Class Politics of Decluttering

by Stephanie Land

In a piece published by the New York Times, writing fellow Stephanie Land explores the role that class plays in the minimalist movement. She writes that, for many Americans, a minimalist life is an economic […]

Counting Every Vote Amid Voter Suppression in Florida

by Thomas Kennedy

While the blue wave swept across the country last week, you might have missed it if you live in Florida. Despite Democrats winning control of the House of Representatives, flipping […]

I Went from Being Homeless to a Full-Time Writer. Trump Wants to End the Programs That Got Me Here.

by Stephanie Land

Six years ago, I lived with my then 3-year-old daughter, Mia, in a studio apartment. During the day I worked full-time as a maid, cleaning the houses of wealthy people. […]

Housing Development Closes Doors On Poor Residents

by Loryn Wilson

New York City developers are building a new luxury apartment that will apparently have a separate entrance for its affordable housing residents. Extell Development Company, who is behind the luxury […]

From CAG: A New National Movement Forms to Protect and Expand Care

by Annie-Rose Strasser

  Here is a press release from our partners at Caring Across Generations WASHINGTON, D.C.—On Tuesday, July 12, over 700 people from across the country joined Senior White House Advisor […]

The March Marches On

by Rich Stolz

I’m in Alabama to take part in the 47th reenactment of the historic civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.  The 50 mile march is taking place over 5 […]

Will Latino’s Turnout to Vote This Year?

by Thomas Kennedy

With only days left until the midterm election is finally over, one question lingers in the minds of Democratic operatives working in battleground states across the country. Will Latino turnout […]

Magic

by Gabe Gonzalez

This week my daughters all lined up to see the last Harry Potter movie. I won’t lie, I wanted to see it too, but I was working. They love the […]

What Living in a High-Poverty Neighborhood Taught Me About Protests

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

Photo credits to Dorret.  Originally published in TalkPoverty.  About 13 years ago, I lived in Charleston, South Carolina, where I was trying to make ends meet as a freelance writer.  […]

A Mother’s Love, An Activist’s Mind

by Allie Carter

Below is a post from Tammy Thomas Miles, Field Organizer with CCC — Each year at Thanksgiving I often take the time to reflect on all the things which I […]

What’s the Matter with the Middle Class?

by Sean Thomas-Breitfeld

Last week, “class” was in the news. But – as usual for most all of our political discourse – the focus was on the struggles of the amorphous “middle” class, […]

What’s Next for the March for Our Lives Movement?

by Karl Catarata

Exactly one month ago, the world watched as Americans took to the streets to march for their lives and demand that legislators enact common sense gun reform. Sparked by youth […]

Sacrificing the Poor for Better Poll Numbers

by Kathleen Tresslar

Once again, we have Republicans in this country putting their own political interests over the needs of their constituents. This time, it’s in the implementation of the Medicaid expansion in […]

The Power of Organizing

by Alesia Lucas

Today’s Washington Post documents crucial organizing work undertaken by the Center for Community Change.  One of the Post’s top reporters demonstrates the immense power of bringing together the voices of […]

Why Trump’s Supporters Haven’t Abandoned Him

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

Just 100 days into his presidency, Americans no longer expect President Donald Trump to keep the promises that got him elected. He walked back his promises on China, delivered nothing […]

Health and Wealth – Women and Self-Care

by Loryn Wilson

Stress affects women from all walks of life, from Beyonce to the lady at the checkout stand. In The Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Pushes Back from the Brink, a new […]

Living Hour-to-Hour: The New Reality of Retail Work

by Mark Ortiz

Andrew Foles*, a 25-year-old retail associate at Macy’s in San Francisco, says he would prefer to work full-time in order to budget his monthly expenses. Unfortunately, in today’s retail industry, […]

May Day, May Day! Immigrant workers and low-wage workers unite

by Micaela Watts

Struggle to survive on poverty wages builds solidarity among workers

The Real Homeless Hotspots

by Anton Conkle

The annual music festival, South by Southwest (SXSW) typically generates tons of publicity each year. Held in Austin, Texas, the 10-day festival includes news conferences on the latest technological trends, […]

Jobs With Justice March: Recap

by Fred McKissack Jr.

Of all the excellent moments at last weekend’s Jobs with Justice conference, the one the continues to stick out for me was when Melonie Griffiths yelled, “I am the movement!” […]

A College Senior’s Outlook on the Economy

by Donna DeLaCruz

Kelissa Hieber is a student on a mission. The senior at Miami University in Ohio has an internship she loves at We Are Ohio. The Integrative Studies major is focusing […]

Four ideas on how to take down Memphis’ Confederate monuments now

by Wendi C. Thomas

If there’s the will, Memphis leaders can find a way to remove these symbols of white supremacy.

Another House Political Smoke and Mirrors Trick—The KIDS Act

by Erin Brock

As the House Judiciary Committee begins its review of the KIDS act, proposed by Representative Eric Cantor, its inadequacy is already becoming clear. The act is part of the House […]

Students have had enough of shootings

by Karl Catarata

This letter to the editor originally published in the Las Vegas Sun. This year, Feb. 14 was both Valentine’s Day and Ash Wednesday. There were people in Las Vegas with […]

President Obama, Think Big in 2015

by Robin Curran

It’s a new year, which means new resolutions, new inaugurations and the beginning of holding politicians accountable for their campaign promises. Last week I attended the Washington Interfaith Network’s (WIN) […]

How Tennessee laws keep ex-offenders from getting good jobs

by Wendi C. Thomas

Employees with criminal records don’t make workplaces less safe, yet licensing restrictions bar them from dozens of careers

Trump’s “public charge” rule puts immigrant families at risk

by Mikka Macdonald

In early October, the Trump administration proposed changes to the “public charge” rule which would prevent immigrants on the path to citizenship who use some government benefits from gaining permanent […]

Let’s Hear it For These Social Justice Champions!

by Kathleen Tresslar

The champions of change in our communities rarely receive the credit they deserve. The road to change is long, and it’s important to take a few stops along the way […]

Black and Brown Families United in the Era of Political Dysfunction

by Paige DeLoach

This article originally appeared in the Huffington Post. By Paige DeLoach When I visited home for the first time after the 2016 election, my mother spoke to me in a […]

Worker Justice on Display in D.C. This Weekend

by Fred McKissack Jr.

The state of worker justice will be on display this coming weekend in Washington, D.C. at the Jobs with Justice national conference. The two-day conference that begins Friday in the […]

Salve for Salt-filled Wounds: Healing after Mike Brown

by Tamika Middleton

Pictured here: Tamika Middleton, left, holds her daughter Asha at a rally for Mike Brown. Photo credit: Tamieka Atkins  I didn’t cry Monday night.  I turned off Prosecutor Bob McCulloch’s press conference […]

The 2012 Change Champion Awards

by Alesia Lucas

Join us in honoring leaders from diverse fields who dedicate themselves to changing the conditions that create poverty and inequity, and who work to build power in low-income communities and […]

Report from the Supreme Court Hearing on Health Care

by Theo GibbsPlessl

Voices were loud and emotions were high on the usually austere marble steps of the Supreme Court this morning. About 250 people rallied in front of the Court building to […]

Going Against the Healthcare Insanity of the GOP Was the Only Option Out There

by Thomas Kennedy

This article originally appeared on Latino Rebels. Is there a more fitting metaphor for the plight of our current political climate than Republicans pushing a vote to take away healthcare from millions […]

The 60 most dangerous days for Floridians: When their legislators gather

by Thomas Kennedy

I once heard the Florida legislative session referred to as the sixty most dangerous days of the year for people in the state. At the end of the 2019 session, […]

Minimum Wage Momentum!

by Donna DeLaCruz

Pictured here: People cheer the moment the minimum wage bill passes in the Seattle City Council. There have been a lot of minimum wage victories in the news lately. Yesterday, the […]

The case for justice through journalism

by Wendi C. Thomas

Reporting has a role to play in economic justice. We’re here to play that role. Economic justice. That’s what brought Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to Memphis in April 1968. […]

The Luxury of Being Grateful

by Amanda Sands

I spent the better part of one morning last week telling dozens of low-income people of color that they had to CHOOSE ONE: cranberry sauce, stuffing in a box, or […]

Raising America’s Pay

by Donna DeLaCruz

On June 4, the Economic Policy Institute launched “Raising America’s Pay,” a research and public education initiative that seeks to make wage growth an urgent priority. Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez […]

Using Our Dollars as Voting Ballots

by Mark Ortiz

While the country ramps up for another festive holiday season, people who work in retail jobs across the nation tend to cringe at the approaching days. The holidays can be […]

Immigrants to Yale, “We aren’t Guinea pigs!”

by Alesia Lucas

Yale recently suspended plans to create a center in conjunction with the Department of Defense that would train U.S. soldiers in the art of interrogation by using immigrants as their […]

Uninsured and afraid

by Sharisse Tracey

Other than the time when I was a young bride expecting my first child, I’ve had health insurance. Back then, my job as a receptionist didn’t offer coverage nor did […]

Why I’m Marching

by Zachary Langway

I’m in Alabama this week, marching along the Selma to Montgomery highway that 47 years ago marked one of the most important moments in our nation’s history.  400 strong, we […]

Behind the Scenes Heroes

by Tori O'Neal

Before we met Joyce Dickinson, a retired home care worker in Florida, she didn’t know that she could pick up the phone and call her member of Congress. Ms. Dickinson […]

Happy 50th Birthday, to the Center for Community Change!

by Cristina Rayas

The Center for Community Change turns 50 this year! Staff and extended family of CCC have special birthday messages for the organization that faces a major milestone in transformational change. […]

Sen. Reed to Recirculate a Bill That is ACTUALLY Good for Students

by Jennifer Wang

Months ago, Sen. Jack Reed, a longstanding champion for students, introduced the Responsible Student Loan Solutions Act, a bill that would have prevented interest rates on all new federal Stafford […]

Arnie Graf: 2015 Change Champion in Community Organizing

by Melissa Hewitt

Kate Casa contributed to this article. It was the mid-1960s and Arnie Graf, a 19-year-old student at the mostly segregated University of Buffalo, found himself witnessing discrimination in a very […]

Of Love And Politics, And Jeb Bush’s Surprising Statement

by Kica Matos

This post originally appeared as an op-ed in Fox News Latino. It was the immigrant and Latino vote that helped President Obama win the White House in 2008 and 2012 because […]

Shouting Beyond the Feminist Choir

by Angela Zhao

When America celebrates Women’s Equality Day today, perhaps she will post pictures of her inspirational inhabitants on Instagram, or write a long heartfelt post about female empowerment on Facebook, sprinkling […]

Affordable Health Care Repeal: Or How To Steal From The Poor And Give To The Rich

by Thomas Kennedy

I know what lack of health care can do to a family in need. About two years ago, my undocumented father was suffering from a form of degenerative arthritis which […]

Black Panther shows us heroism is not perfect

by Jeremiah Chapman

It was less than a year ago that I moved to Oakland, California – home of the Black Panther Party. I remember being so excited after years of emulating the […]

The Census Report: Good News and More Bad News

by Loryn Wilson

New data from the Census shows that poverty rates are down, particularly among children. 14.5 percent of Americans are now living in poverty, down from 15 percent in 2012. Many […]

The High Cost of Low Wages

by Alesia Lucas

As Congress debates the fiscal cliff, hopefully avoiding balancing the budget on the backs of workers, they should look at retail industry workers. The retail industry has bounced back from […]

Working Women of Color and Wages

by Alesia Lucas

Women are more likely than their male counterparts to pursue higher education (see graph on right); and yet they still don’t make more money. Latino women make 60 cents for […]

$40, Why It Is Important

by Donna DeLaCruz

Because it's the holiday season, my son Alex came to work today. And he got to come on a very special trip– to see the President argue for a payroll […]

Putting Families First: Good Jobs for All

by Deepak Bhargava

This piece was originally published on TalkPoverty.org. On a December morning nearly 60 years ago, Rosa Parks refused to yield her seat to a white man on a public bus […]

Florida gets a second chance to make amends for its racist past

by Thomas Kennedy

Back in late 2016, a grassroots coalition of volunteers accomplished a remarkable feat. More than 68,314 petition signatures were collected in Florida, triggering a Supreme Court review on a ballot […]

Why I Was Arrested

by Deepak Bhargava

I was arrested for Oscar Alfaro. Oscar came to the U.S. to escape poverty and make enough money to support his family. Now, he fears being deported and separated from […]

Trump’s budget will take food away from the struggling families, children and the elderly who need it most

by Holly Straut-Eppsteiner

Since the release of the 2019 Trump budget, a great deal of attention has focused on its proposal to eliminate half of families’ food assistance benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition […]

What to Do When the Rising Cost of Housing Outpaces Stagnant Wages

by Michael Anderson

Simultaneous to the growing momentum to raise state and federal minimum wages, The Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies released a sobering new report in December of 2013 documenting that […]

The War on Drugs is a War on Poor Black and Brown People

by Olivia Chow

Charlo Greene is the subject of a viral video, cursing on live TV as she quits her job as a news reporter to fight full time to decriminalize marijuana. We […]

Potential Deferred

by Fred McKissack Jr.

Like the rest of the country, Gary, Indiana, is wrestling with what was, what is, and what may come

What I Learned After My Mother’s Near-Arrest in St. Louis

by Fred McKissack Jr.

Twenty years ago, I packed my gold Chevy Nova and drove across the Mississippi River toward Madison, Wisconsin. Like so many others who uproot from their hometowns, I did so […]

In Search of Solidarity

by Ashley Ferguson

Something seems to be missing these days in America, and it’s the spirit of solidarity. It seems like we’ve been a country of “what’s in it for me” for a […]

Raising their voices at the Latin Grammy Awards with Alejandro Sanz for #DreamActNow

by Cristina Rayas

30 young leaders came together at The Latin Grammys to spotlight the urgent need for the Dream Act.

Bringing the Community Together, One Business at a Time

by Sebastian Medina-Tayac

Bounce Milwaukee closed on May Day in observance of Voces de la Frontera’s “Day Without Immigrants” strike and rally.

Voice of a (New) American

by Jingru Huang

One of America’s treasures is the freedom we enjoy, the absence of restraints on our ability to think and to act. We the people, who live in this country, live […]

Give A Care! Campaign Celebrating Caregivers Launched Today

by Donna DeLaCruz

Website, Video Shows Importance of Caregivers, Why They Deserve Support For Immediate Release: August 8, 2012 Contact: Donna De La Cruz, 202-339-9331, [email protected] (WASHINGTON)—Single parents, adults caring for sick children […]

Caring for our loved ones is a key issue in this year’s elections in Michigan

by Mike Griffin

This November, Michigan has a critical choice to make for the future of families struggling to get by. Attacks on immigrants, a lack of good paying jobs and the exploding […]

Good Jobs Lost

by Wendi C. Thomas

This story was originally published in the Memphis Flyer.  For 17 years, Zorina Bowen was a research biochemist. She was good at what she did and loved her job. But […]

Three Years after Trayvon: Power Built from Tragedy

by Chris Dasan Ahanu Massenburg

Three years ago today, 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was fatally shot by George Zimmerman in Sanford, Florida. The circumstances surrounding the case led to a nationwide outcry for justice. Many were […]

11 Things Rich People Can do for You

by Annie-Rose Strasser

If you’re in the mood to get annoyed about income inequality, check out this infographic from United for a Fair Economy below. Just imagine– free gas for three and a […]

Prince Was The Only Person Who Defined Himself

by Fred McKissack Jr.

Originally published on the Huffington Post.  Last night, my 12-year-old son was in his room reading and listening to music. His musical tastes run from modern pop and hip-hop to […]

The New Suburban Poverty

by Adam Isaacson

When it comes to American poverty, the landscape is changing. According to a new study by the Brookings Institution, poverty is increasing at its fastest rate in “major metropolitan suburbs,” […]

Sunday rally planned to mark one-year anniversary of Memphis bridge protest

by Wendi C. Thomas

This article originally appeared on MLK50. On Sunday, organizers will gather at Tom Lee Park to mark the anniversary of the July 10, 2016 protest that shut down the Hernando-Desoto […]

1,000 Strong March for Immigrant Rights

by Rich Stolz

Pictured in the middle is Deepak Bhargava, Executive Director of the Center for Community Change. Yesterday’s focus of the Selma-to-Montgomery march was immigration rights and it was breathtaking to see […]

Small Steps, Big Change

by Zachary Langway

Day three of the Social Good Summit, sponsored by Mashable, 92Y and the UN Foundation, really focused in on the small steps that, when taken and aggregated, can lead to […]

“We Can’t Cut Ourselves into Prosperity”

by Amanda Sands

Last week, I attended a panel hosted by the Economic Policy Institute and Oxfam America, featuring US Representatives Keith Ellison (D-MN) and Jim Walsh (R-NY), economists and researchers, and two […]

By Supporting Kavanaugh, Rubio and Scott Are Betraying the Women They Represent

by Elizabeth Fernandez

How much more are women expected to endure from the Trump administration? It’s not enough to have a president in power who was caught on tape bragging about committing sexual […]

Dreaming of a Black Christmas

by Tamika Middleton

Today, Mike Brown should be finishing his first college finals, preparing to spend winter break with his family. Eric Garner should be getting his Santa suit ready, so that he […]

Trump’s efforts to keep immigrant families apart hearkens to our racist immigration past

by Mikka Macdonald

Our country’s modern history of immigration is built on white men’s attempts to create a whiter nation. Donald Trump’s efforts to tear at family reunification in the name of ‘ending […]

As Trump Inauguration Looms, Immigrants Stand Up To Private Prison Industry

by Thomas Kennedy

All across the country in dozens of cities, communities are gearing up for January 14th, a national day of action where people will link arms and stand up against the […]

Welcome to A Prairie Homeboy Companion

by Fred McKissack Jr.

Welcome to A Prairie Homeboy Companion, a weekly blog exploring progressive activism in the Midwest, as well as an occasional platform for my own thoughts on pop culture, politics, and […]

Our Fellow American Citizens Need Food, Water, Electricity And Fuel, Not Paper Towels Thrown At Them.

by Thomas Kennedy

Puerto Rico needs help: Food, electricity, clean water, clean up and the restoration of its infrastructure. Yet Donald Trump has once again proven he is unfit for office after his […]

Making History in Alabama

by Deepak Bhargava

This past week, I had the privilege of joining with thousands of people from Alabama and around the country who walked from Selma to Montgomery to commemorate the historic march […]

Poverty in Color: Race, Class and Television

by Loryn Wilson

Last week, NPR ran a story about who is poor on TV –and how some television shows depict poor people. Two of those shows were Good Times and The Wire, […]

Detroit’s Walking Man: Beyond Click-Through Generosity

by Wendi C. Thomas

It’s fitting that James Robertson’s good luck falls during Black History Month. Robertson, 56, started riding four buses and walking 21 miles round-trip to get from his Detroit home to […]

The Real Debt Danger

by Annie-Rose Strasser

  The debt debate has become one of those ear-numbing topics of conversation where you can’t tell anymore what’s worth listening to. There have been so many proposed plans and […]

For Code Crew founders, paying a living wage is the right thing to do

by Melonee Gaines

The nonprofit trains youth of color to be the next generation of techies and practices the economic justice MLK preached

Who are the DREAMers?

by Mikka Macdonald

Dreamers are the nearly 800,000 people whose immigration and work statuses are protected by DACA.

I Lived On $6 A Day With A 6-year-old And A Baby On The Way. It Was Extreme Poverty.

by Stephanie Land

Originally published on The Guardian.  It didn’t take me long to go from financial stability to fearing homelessness. In January 2014 I was 35-years-old, raising a six-year-old nearly full-time and […]

A Message to the President and Congress: Listen to America!

by Donna DeLaCruz

The 2012 elections show that Americans want President Obama and Congress to strengthen the middle class, put people back to work, embrace prosperity economics over austerity, and protect essential retirement […]

Let’s Stop Donald Trump From Wielding His Budget As A Weapon Against Hardworking Immigrant Families

by Thomas Kennedy

This article first appeared on the Huffington Post. For a big chunk of my childhood, teenage years and early adulthood, my parents and I were undocumented immigrants in this country, […]

Crossing Over: An Eye-Opening Read

by Abby Marco

After finishing the book Crossing Over by Ruben Martínez, there was one story that I couldn’t get out of my head. The nonfiction book follows the journeys of many immigrant […]

Economic Injustice Needs More Attention

by Jingru Huang

The Brookings Institution pointed out that high-income kids who don’t graduate from college are 2.5 times more likely to end up rich than low-income kids who do get a degree. […]

Remembering Eric Quezada

by Annie-Rose Strasser

Below is a note from our managing director, Mary Lassen.  Eric Quezada passed away early this morning in San Francisco.  Eric’s wife, Lorena Melgarejo, is a key member of CCC’s Immigration […]

McCaskill Says “Don’t Be Penny-wise and Pound-foolish; Don’t Gut Medicaid.”

by Annie-Rose Strasser

At a rally in Washington DC this week, Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri came out strongly for protecting Medicaid. During her speech at the Medicaid Matters Across Generations event, McCaskill […]

Baltimore doesn’t need more mothers like Toya Graham

by Wendi C. Thomas

When Baltimore mom Toya Graham saw TV footage of her masked son joining rioters following the funeral of Freddie Gray, she found him on the streets and beat him. Video […]

Pell grants put me through college. Now Trump wants to cut them.

by Stephanie Land

I started college when my daughter was only 14 months old. We had been homeless six months earlier. My life up until I discovered I was pregnant had been blissfully […]

Reflection on Ferguson, Missouri

by Tammy Thomas-Miles

Field Organizer Tammy Thomas-Miles went to Ferguson, Missouri over the Labor Day weekend as part of a strategy session with other organizers. Here is Tammy’s first person account of the […]

And #StillIRise: #PeoplesConvention takes over Pittsburgh

by Wendi C. Thomas

Wendi C. Thomas is a writing fellow for the Center for Community Change. [View the story “And #StillIRise: #PeoplesConvention takes over Pittsburgh” on Storify]

Formerly Incarcerated Leaders React to the Introduction of Ban the Box Legislation

by Olivia Chow

Formerly incarcerated people and their loved ones welcomed today’s introduction of the Fair Chance to Compete for Jobs Act of 2015 by Sens. Cory Booker and Ron Johnson, and Reps. […]

Personal Narratives Can Change the World

by Stephanie Land

This trip wasn’t just another day of traveling for work. I hadn’t been able to travel much at all in the last few years, and hadn’t flown on a plane […]

“That box was the bane of my existence”

by Mark Ortiz

Photo to the left: Dorsey Nunn is executive director of Legal Services for Prisoners with Children and founder of All of Us or None, which advocates for prison reform and […]

Committed to Lies

by Wendi C. Thomas

This post was originally published in The Memphis Flyer. Emancipation by veracity is a beautiful, if elusive, concept. People in search of comfort may turn to scripture after last week’s […]

Why Poverty Isn’t a Halloween Costume

by Stephanie Land

Originally published on Talk Poverty and The Nation.  When a website documenting the attire of Walmart customers surfaced several years ago, its popularity grew quickly. As Walmart is known for […]

Let’s Guarantee Every High School Student a Summer Job

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

Photo credits to Flazingo Photos.  Originally posted on the Huffington Post.  In New York City, where the summer job program for high school students is run on a neighborhood lotto […]

Dishonesty is Not the Best Policy

by Jingru Huang

When police ask for your help, most people are inclined to help them. Amber’s husband falls into that category. But Amber and her family were shocked at what happened after […]

One Family’s Struggle to Find Jobs

by Donna DeLaCruz

Among the hundreds of people at a rally last week in Charlotte, N.C., calling on Congress to create more jobs to get our economy going again were two sisters and […]

Putting Families First: The Movement for Child Care and Early Learning

by Cristina Rayas

Let’s put families first – with the voices of parents, child care givers, and organizers, we will strengthen the power of our communities, and give the most vulnerable members of our society a chance to thrive.

Mothers just set the table for our powerful movement towards justice

by Catherine Bugayong

Growing up, I was often asked to set the table for dinner. In our busy household, dinner was just about the only time we could have both parents and all […]

Double Standard, Double Spacing

by Sharisse Tracey

This article originally appeared on the Huffington Post. Late in April, approximately 1,000 students in the Upward Bound Program at The University of Maine Presque Isle (UMPI) received notice that […]

‘Unlocking Opportunities’ Policy Brief

by Joseph Pate

By: Dorian T. Warren, Chirag Mehta, Steve Savner Imagine a 21st-century jobs program that puts families first, makes extensive investments in America’s most impoverished places and creates millions of good […]

The People Behind the Issues

by Erin Brock

In the five years that I have volunteered at schools in Tegucigalpa and Talanga Honduras I’ve been exposed to the reality of many things.  The beauty of simple human interaction.  […]

There Is Reason for Black Women to Fear Traffic Stops

by Wendi C. Thomas

Photo credits to Luca Venturi.  Originally published on The Undefeated.  Not long after I arrived in Cambridge, Massachusetts, last August for a yearlong fellowship, a friend back in Memphis, Tennessee, asked […]

Florida Special Election Shows Voters Reject Trump’s Politics Of Hate

by Thomas Kennedy

In April, state Senator Frank Artiles resigned from his seat in Florida’s recently redistricted Senate District 40, after directing racist remarks against fellow lawmakers in a drunken tirade. This was […]

Fighting for the Future of America’s 99%

by Deepak Bhargava

Today, with the 2012 elections looming before us, we must ensure that the national movement we’ve helped to build has the clout to make our politicians listen. We will all […]

How Does Great Change Happen?

by Julia Paik

Great changes in our history have always come through mass pressure from outside combined with receptive leadership in positions of power. President Obama, himself once a community organizer, is fond […]

Comic W. Kamau Bell: We Are Living In The ‘Most Racial America’

by Wendi C. Thomas

Originally published on the Huffington Post.  PITTSBURGH – Police have one standard for black people and another for white people – and as proof, comic W. Kamau Bell played at […]

Unemployment Numbers and the Money Trail

by Gabe Gonzalez

It takes money to make money. Everybody knows that. If you want to start a business, you need money to set the business up. You have to advertise, there are […]

Thinking of My Mother and Our Broken Economy

by Chris Dasan Ahanu Massenburg

When I was growing up, I was a “latch key” kid, a popular term for a child who has to come home and lock himself in after school because no […]

Majority of Americans Make Sacrifices to Cover High Cost of Housing

by Michael Anderson

Whether taking on an additional job, cutting back on healthy food or health care, deferring retirement savings, amassing credit card debt, or moving to a neighborhood that is either unsafe […]

Putting Faces on the Immigration Debate

by Erin Brock

Inside Out photo project has come to DC to take on immigration reform.  The group, who uses large portraits taken in their mobile photo booth as art installations around the […]

Mapping the Impact

by Adam Isaacson

Today I stumbled across this interactive map, which charts the impact of immigrant students, workers and entrepreneurs in every American state. The project, known as Map the Impact, is informative […]

There’s a Reason Black Youth Call Chicago ‘Chiraq’ and It’s Not Just Criminals Doing the Shooting

by Fred McKissack Jr.

Written by Center for Communtiy Change Writing Fellow Fred McKissack. There’s a reason why young black people call Chicago “Chiraq.” It’s like a war zone in some neighborhoods. And it’s […]

When the last measures of security are under attack, it’s time to organize and amplify.

by Cristina Rayas

The aftermath of the 2016 Election was an opportunity for lawmakers to take aim at the safety net programs in the United States, putting profits over people.

MLK and the “Beloved Community”

by Ronnie Galvin

On Friday, January 16th, Kica Matos, Director of Immigrant Rights and Racial Justice at the Center for Community Change, delivered the keynote address at the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum’s 30th […]

Blazing a New Path in Alabama

by Anton Conkle

Check out the highlights from the historic re-enactment of 2012’s Selma to Montgomery march. This year was especially monumental as thousands came out in solidarity to express their opposition to […]

Netroots, #BlackLivesMatter and the Putting Families First campaign

by Olivia Chow

This week we have seen a phenomenal shift in the conversation around race and poverty.  We are beginning to see a movement’s narrative take hold in the public debate and […]

The food stamp problem parents don’t talk about

by Stephanie Land

Originally published on SheKnows. I only recently stopped buying foods for my 8-year-old daughter that list ingredients I don’t recognize. For half of her life, when I went shopping, I […]

The GOP #TaxScamBill Is Another Way To Make The Rich Richer On The Backs Of The Poor

by Thomas Kennedy

Back in September, Senator John McCain announced in a statement that he could not “in good conscience” vote for the GOP’s healthcare bill, effectively ending Republican efforts to repeal and […]

Living with racism in these times

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

It is my belief that for black Americans, and other people of color in America, dealing with racism is unavoidable. It is built into the economic structure. It is sewn […]

Fast Food Workers Demand Higher Pay

by Loryn Wilson

Last month, fast food workers went on strike in 100 cities across the country. The workers are fighting for a $15 an hour wage and the right to organize into […]

The OFA Takes a Page from Keeping Families Together

by Alesia Lucas

With President Obama’s second term in full swing his former campaign organization has decided to take on immigration reform.  Taking a page from the Keeping Families Together Campaign, The Obama […]

Two Sides of the Safety Net – Exclusion and Inclusion

by Annie-Rose Strasser

Sylvia Lundberg, a Social Security recipient, reflects on her experiences with the program. Today is the 76th anniversary of Social Security.  When I was a young teenager, my family was […]

All I want for Christmas is for My Vote to Have Teeth

by Steve Huerta

This year as struggling families in San Antonio, Texas open their holiday gifts, they should also remember they have a gift far more valuable than any trinket they receive. It […]

A View of Obama’s Jobs Plan from Ohio

by Donna DeLaCruz

Heather Wingo is a native of Chillicothe, Ohio and wanted to build a better future for her two young children. Working as a server and jack of all trades at […]

Officer Friendly Encounters That Old Black Magic

by Tamika Middleton

This post originally appeared on Colorlines.com.  Georgia State Senator Vincent Fort and members of Atlanta activist groups gathered in front of Atlanta police headquarters last Monday, May 4, to call […]

When Marvel’s Black Panther meets black America

by Christen Hill

I was standing in line at a Georgetown movie theater this weekend when a woman asked if there was an African celebration taking place. She glanced at my orange tiger-striped […]

The Working Poor

by Erin Brock

15% of the U.S. population lives below the national poverty line. That’s 46.2 million people. And though many are quick to name a lack of motivation, laziness and irresponsibility as […]

Florida Hotline Offers Immigrants A Lifeline

by Thomas Kennedy

Since the election of Donald Trump to the presidency, the daily lives of undocumented immigrants in this country have become nerve wracking. The hateful rhetoric espoused by Trump during his […]

Let’s Target Infrastructure Jobs to Communities Most in Need

by Rich Stolz

Today the Transportation Equity Network released a national report ranking the states based on how well they prepare and create job opportunities for low-income and minority residents and women on transportation infrastructure […]

Time to Do Something About Our Broken Immigration System

by Shikun Sun

For anyone who does not think our immigration system is broken, here is the story of Sigifredo Saldana Iracheta, an immigrant and father whose attempts to be a U.S. citizen […]

A Sad Holiday this Labor Day

by Donna DeLaCruz

As Labor Day approaches, let’s remember this is a day to celebrate working men and women. If only the unemployment rate wasn’t so high, it would truly be a great […]

Kasich, The Puppet

by Julia Clunn

While some of us may still have hope that Democrats will hold their ground against GOP determination to cut Social Security and other entitlements, Ohio residents are struggling against their […]

Despite Promises, Florida Police Are Acting Like Immigration Agents And Separating Families

by Thomas Kennedy

This article first appeared on the Huffington Post. Driving without a license can be a daily nerve wrecking experience for a lot of undocumented immigrants living and working in the […]

Senate health care bill would pull the lifeline of the chronically ill

by Stephanie Land

This article originally appeared in the Missoulian. Jamison Hill hasn’t been able to get out of bed in two and a half years. For 18 months, Jamison was too sick […]

Expecting Civility, Hoping for Love

by Fred McKissack Jr.

“Civility is one thing you can expect at an Episcopal church,” my uncle said to me two Sunday’s ago as we motored along Interstate-170, a short, sometimes bumpy highway that […]

The Politics of Holidays

by Chris Dasan Ahanu Massenburg

“It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas, everywhere you go; take a look at the five and ten, glistening once again with candy canes and silver lanes aglow…” -Robert […]

The Immigrant Community Comes Together

by Jingru Huang

Leaders of the Asian Pacific American community are supporting the Keeping Families Together mission. Comprehensive immigration reform is essential because families should never be separated. When mentioning the “undocumented immigrants”, […]

DREAMer Unshackled but Threat of Deportation Remains

by Mary Moreno

As unexpectedly as it was put on, Matias Ramos’ electronic monitoring ankle bracelet came off last night. Matias, an undocumented DREAM Act leader, was home in his DC apartment when […]

CBU freshman ‘had a breakdown’ when she learned of DOJ plan to end DACA

by Rebekah Marie Yearout

Chantel Barcenas had an identity crisis when learning she was not a U.S. citizen. An Obama-era policy helped her find a sense of purpose — all now in flux

How Long Must We Sing This Song?

by Fred McKissack Jr.

As we walked through St. Louis’ Missouri Historical Museum’s current civil rights exhibit, I was reminded of how change comes from the bottom up. School history is, too often, from […]

“When They See Us” Through the Eyes of a 13-year-old Girl

by Sharisse Tracey

“I don’t want to watch this, Mommy, it is making me mad and I already know how it will end,” said my recently turned 13 year-old daughter with folded arms. […]

Remember November

by Deepak Bhargava

It’s been seven long months since Election Day. It’s been seven long months and there is still no immigration bill in the House of Representatives. We need more than just […]

Rewriting the Rules to Benefit Everyone, Not Just the Wealthy

by Angela Zhao

Angela Zhao is the Communications Intern at the Center for Community Change. Although the Roosevelt Institute’s” Rewriting the Rules” is a 115-page report advocating almost all imaginable social and economic […]

Tell your Representatives that you want immigration reform, now!

by Alesia Lucas

Tomorrow is the final day of National Call-in week for immigration reform.  We need everyone to call their representatives and urge them to support immigration reform that keeps families together […]

#TakeAKnee Is A Patriotic Protest Against Police Brutality And Injustice

by Thomas Kennedy

It seems clear that Donald Trump will manufacture or grasp at anything he can to divide Americans from each other. Even use one of America’s favorite past times: football. Trump […]

Durbin’s DREAMers Dream Just Like Us

by Logan Meltzer

As the DREAMers stood up one by one, beaming with pride as their stories were revealed to the audience, Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL) looked on like a proud father. He […]

Domestic Violence is Trapping Women in More Than Just Bad Relationships

by Stephanie Land

Originally published on SheKnows. There are moments in my life that I can return to easily. I don’t have to close my eyes or envision the surroundings or what it […]

The LGBT Provision: Too Much to Lose

by Kris Kelkar

UPDATE: As of today, the “risk” that including the LGBT community in comprehensive immigration reform posed to the Senate bill’s passage is no longer an issue.  The Supreme Court’s decision […]

A Special Day for Me

by Jingru Huang

This week, Fair Immigration Reform Movement (FIRM) leaders went to the House Judiciary Committee to voice their disapproval for the SAFE Act, a bill that takes the extreme measure of […]

Women Fight Poverty NOW

by Nicole Duarte

I walked up the 30th identical driveway to the 30th nearly identical house with my canvassing packet and clipboard tucked neatly under my arm. I smiled at a man working […]

Change Champion: Congressman Raúl Grijalva

by Allison Mitchell

Congressman Raúl M. Grijalva is serving his 5th term in Congress, and is our 2011 Community Change Champion honoree in public service. A native of Tucson, Arizona and son of […]

Attorney General Sessions brings tough-on-crime message to Memphis

by Micaela Watts

Appearance coincides with mayor’s, police director’s demands for more city police

Frances Perkins: Equal pay trailblazer

by Nicole Duarte

Frances Perkins, former Secretary of Labor and first woman to hold a Presidential cabinet appointment, began her career fighting poverty in some of the most impoverished communities in New York […]

UFCW Leading the Fight for Immigration Reform

by Andi Ryder

In 2014, there were 8.1 million undocumented immigrants employed in the United States. These hard-working men and women live in constant fear of arrest and deportation which would rip their […]

White Supremacy Kills, No Matter Who Pulls the Trigger

by Wendi C. Thomas

Photo credits to Fuseboxradio. Originally published on The Undefeated. I want to watch the video of Terence Crutcher being killed by Tulsa, Oklahoma, police, because I want to see something […]

College Degrees Lead to Jobs… Right?

by Abby Marco

The other day, someone asked me why I made my college decision. As I prepared one of my typical “I love the city/the political atmosphere is great/I wanted a challenge” […]

Rubio’s Amendment: Just Another Roadblock

by Erin Brock

Senator Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) has proposed an amendment that would require immigrants to pass a level-3 English proficiency test in order to receive a green card for permanent residency in […]

Inside The Statue of Liberty’s Radical Feminist, Pro-Refugee Roots

by Alison Stine

America may have rejected a woman to lead the nation, but Lady Liberty’s steadfast arm still leads the way

Militarizing our schools leaves immigrant youth vulnerable

by Thomas Kennedy

After 17 children were shot dead at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, is the answer to preventing gun violence in America arming teachers? Across the country, we have seen rhetoric […]

Retail work and the instability of the New Year

by Mark Ortiz

The New Year tends to be a time for new beginnings, but for Americans who work in seasonal jobs in the retail industry, the New Year can be a very […]

Trickle Down Devastation: A Single Mom Responds to Trump’s Tax Plan

by Alison Stine

ATHENS, Ohio – You’re not a single mother. You have a spouse or a partner. You don’t have kids, or if you do, you’re raising them in a two-parent, two-income […]

Advocacy Network Holds Presidential Candidates Accountable to Bold Immigration Solutions

by Sophie Maisterra Navratil

Earlier this summer, FIRM Action, Community Change Action, and CHIRLA Action Fund hosted the Unity and Freedom Presidential Forum to elevate the voices of immigrants and engage presidential candidates in […]

Caregivers: Unrecognized Heroes

by Abby Marco

Though we don’t often think of it, we have all had caregivers, and we will all likely be a caregiver at one point or another in our lives. Caregivers are […]

What I’ve Learned

by Kris Kelkar

To be honest, I didn’t know what I was signing up for when I accepted my internship at the Center for Community Change. I wanted to work on immigration reform […]

What’s the Matter with Food Stamp Recipients?

by Amanda Sands

If you’re reading this article, you’re probably already aware that the House of Representatives voted to cut the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) by $39 billion. The bill didn’t decrease […]

The Fight Continues

by Jingru Huang

Last Thursday, the Senate voted to pass the bill 68-32, and focus shifted to the House of Representatives as they work on their version of the bill. It has been […]

The Florida Legislators Who’d Rather Hide Than Talk With You

by Thomas Kennedy

I’ve recently seen footage from town halls showing Americans across this country questioning their lawmakers about the concerns that keep them up at night: Paying for health care; watching government […]

Immigrant Families Tell the GOP to Remember November

by Erin Brock

FIRM, CASA de Maryland, SEIU and Bend the Arc Jewish Action, as well as the families they work with, today sent a message to House and Senate Republicans who do […]

What Happened In Parkland Hits Home in Las Vegas

by Karl Catarata

trigger warning: death, gun violence This year, February 14th fell on both Valentine’s Day and Ash Wednesday. The scene here in Las Vegas showed people in the streets with ashes […]

Afraid to Love

by Wendi C. Thomas

This piece was originally posted in The Memphis Flyer. I am afraid to love my 18-month-old nephew because he is a black boy, and in my country, police hunt and […]

Want To Know Why Athletes Chose To #TakeAKnee? Look At Our Broken Justice System

by Fred McKissack Jr.

In an alternate universe, the White House is populated with adroit thinkers who consider that the fastest way to revive a conversation about race and class would be to have […]

Trump – A Racist-In-Chief, Unleashed

by Kica Matos

Earlier this week it seemed as though negotiations over the future of the 800,000 young immigrants formerly protected under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program (“DACA”) had finally turned […]

The Resistance is older than the White House

by Mikka Macdonald

The Resistance is older than the United States. It is older than hashtags, livestreams, and Facebook invitations. The Resistance began the moment colonizers stepped off their boats and claimed North […]

The GOP’s Anti-immigrant Agenda Is Forcing Children To Live in Fear

by Thomas Kennedy

Our President’s actions will unfortunately shape the formative years of some of our most vulnerable youth.

Take a Walk in Their Shoes

by Abby Marco

I have a friend- let’s call her Elizabeth. She is eight years old and attends a D.C. public school, and I spend time with her twice a week. A few […]

Meeting Brenda Ortigoza

by Amanda Sands

On Wednesday, I had the opportunity to shadow kids who were taking part in the “Keeping Families Together: Youth in Action” events on Capitol Hill as they made their way […]

America’s Invisible Farmworkers

by Erin Brock

With summertime comes fresh produce lining farmer’s markets tables and grocery store shelves, and as families sit down to enjoy the feast of fresh, colorful food I’m going to guess […]

Reinvesting In Poor Communities Must Be A Priority

by Joseph Pate

Written by Anthony Newby, executive director for Neighborhoods Organizing for Change in Minneapolis and Dorian Warren, Center for Community Change board chairman. Originally posted on the Al Jazeera America. The […]

Supreme Court Immigration Ruling Could Stop the Intimidation of American Citizens

by Kica Matos

Written by Kica Matos, Center for Community Change Director of Immigrant Rights and Racial Justice, and Frank Sharry, Founder and Executive Director for America’s Voice, an immigration reform group. Teenaged […]

Honoring Deepak Bhargava’s Commitment to Social Justice

by Alesia Lucas

On Sunday, April 21, 2013, The Committee for Effective Leadership will honor four individuals for their exemplary leadership and service. Among the honorees is Deepak Bhargava the Executive Director of […]

Let ‘dreamers’ live in the US — their home

by Jamilah Sabur

I woke the morning of Tuesday, Aug. 29 to the sound of my mother crying on the other side of the wall. I was paralyzed as I listened to her […]

Why the Child Tax Credit is Important to My Family

by John Tejeda

Growing up, my family did not have a lot of money, so my mom was always grateful for the benefit of the Child Tax Credit. That refund was a safety […]

48 Years Ago Today…

by Marvin Randolph

Most people remember Aug. 28, 1963 as the day Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech during the March on Washington. What most people don’t […]

The Dismantling of the EPA Should Really Worry People of Color

by Wendi C. Thomas

It matters because so many of us often live near toxic facilities

How You Can Help Stop Voter Suppression in Florida

by Thomas Kennedy

Last year, I became a United States citizen and a registered voter after living as an undocumented immigrant in this country for more than a decade. I was born in […]

Learning to Walk in a Homeless Shelter

by Stephanie Land

Written by Center for Community Change Writing Fellow Stephanie Land. Originally published in the NY Times. My daughter learned to walk in a homeless shelter. We had one week left […]

The Youth Unemployment Problem

by Alesia Lucas

The Center for Community Change recently released a report highlighting the issue of youth unemployment and under-employment entitled, “Establishing a Foothold in the Labor Market for Young Workers Through Subsidized […]

The Attack on a Muslim Mosque Mirrors Other Hate Crimes

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

I’ve been pretty wrecked most of March as I read about the mass shooting in New Zealand.    The man arrested for carrying out the mosque attacks in what has […]

FIRM Statement: DREAMers Can Finally Achieve Their Dreams!

by Donna DeLaCruz

Deferred Action Application Process Begins Today!   Today, tens of thousands of young DREAM students began applying for the “Deferred Action” policy so they can work and live in the […]

With Each Step, More Determination to Fight for Justice

by Rich Stolz

The 47th reenactment of the historic civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama gets stronger every day. Over the past four days, I’ve had the privilege of marching with […]

One of the 2.5 Million

by Annie-Rose Strasser

Before I started writing for the blog here, I was another out-of-work, recent college graduate, like so many of my friends. My brother had graduated three years before me and, […]

Discussion of Poverty Shouldn’t End Just Because the Headlines Are Gone

by Sean Thomas-Breitfeld

Last week, the U.S. Census Bureau released its annual report on poverty, income and insurance coverage in this country. For the last decade the media has responded to the release […]

The Republican Health Care Plan is an Attack on People Like Me

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

This article first appeared on The Progressive. How many Americans will be impacted by the GOP’s Obamacare repeal legislation, drafted under veils of secrecy? How many will suffer the consequences? […]

The time that guerilla art made Nathan Bedford Forrest’s statue disappear

by Wendi C. Thomas

In 2009, performance art blocked the view of the statue of the Klan’s first grand wizard and slave trader

The Other War on Women

by Caitlin Van Orden

When we hear the term “war on women,” it generally refers to attempts by state and local governments to limit women’s access to reproductive services. While this is a real […]

How to Make Your Voice Heard Without Uttering a Single Word

by Sharisse Tracey

Saturday Night Live has always taken politicians to task with their own way of friendly banter and jesting. And sometimes they take aim at the average citizen, as they did […]

Here’s How Many People it Takes to Replace a Single Mom

by Stephanie Land

Originally published on SheKnows.  In the weeks building up to a business trip, I created a schedule for the five people who’d replace me, a single mom with two kids, […]

Why We’re Fighting to End Poverty in America

by ABaider

Yesterday the 2010 poverty numbers were released by the US Census Bureau.  They confirm what so many of us already know to be true – that the Great Recession is […]

Change Champion: Quinn Delaney

by Allison Mitchell

As we get closer to our 2011 Change Champion Awards on September 22, we’d like you to meet another of our distinduished Champions. Quinn Delaney is the the founder and […]

Where’s the Support?

by Kelly Hwu

It’s no surprise that our country is still struggling with economic conditions, even with the “end of the recession” in June 2009. We’re great at listing the problems associated with […]

“SMILF,” Showtime’s New Series, Doesn’t Sugarcoat Single Motherhood

by Stephanie Land

Stephanie Land reviews SMILF from the perspective of a single mom who’s been there

Why Every Day Should Be National Voter Registration Day

by Erick Pleitez

Today is National Voter Registration Day; a day when organizations across the country reach out to their respective communities encouraging them to register and turn out to vote. In light […]

Immigrant Rights Leader Gives Riveting Testimony at Senate Hearing

by Donna DeLaCruz

For Immediate Release: Monday, April 22, 2013 Contact: For English language Media: Donna De La Cruz, [email protected], 202-339-9331, 202-441-3798 (cell) For Spanish language Media: Ricardo Ramírez, [email protected],  202-339-9371, (202) 905-1738 […]

Why is Poverty Taboo in the Presidential Campaigns?

by Kathleen Tresslar

A lot of important issues were discussed during the first presidential debate. President Obama and GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney were eager to discuss the middle and upper class, but […]

Our Pilgrimage for Immigrant Rights Remains Strong in the Face of Adversity

by Raunel Urquiza

Photo via We Belong Together. There was a lot going on last month with the pope’s visit to DC. The pope addressed a joint session of Congress and spoke on […]

America Needs More ‘Porch Talk’ – And Not Just Every Four Years

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

Every four years, America has a “porch talk” in South Carolina as attention shifts to the first in the south presidential primary. This year, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton […]

Overcoming the Frustration of Injustice

by Jordann Lee

While reading a recent Salon article, “The real story of the shutdown: 50 years of GOP race-baiting,” I cannot honestly say that I was too shocked. The institution of racism is […]

President Obama Signs Executive Order to Raise Minimum Wage for Federal Contractors

by Loryn Wilson

On February 12, President Obama signed an executive order to raise the minimum wage for federal workers to $10.10 per hour. In his remarks before the signing, President Obama discussed […]

Roots of the War on Poverty

by Lynn Kanter

I just finished reading The Passage of Power, the fourth book of Robert Caro’s multi-volume biography of Lyndon Johnson. The book recreates in vivid detail the years 1958 through 1964, […]

Poverty Is Rampant In The U.S., But We Pretend It’s Not

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

When my older brother and I were in elementary school, the teacher assigned the class to bring a bug into class that was familiar in our neighborhood. My brother, who […]

Get to Know a Host #3: Julia Deak

by Annie-Rose Strasser

Julia Deak of Seattle, Washington plans to host a house meeting to rebuild the American Dream on the weekend of July 17. Julia took a few minutes to talk with […]

What working families in Memphis want to GOP candidates to address on Thursday

by Wendi C. Thomas

Pictured to the right: Ella Collins at a Home Care Fight for $15 rally Ten Republican presidential candidates will take the stage in Cleveland Thursday for the GOP’s first televised primary […]

We are killing our children and militarizing their schools won’t make them safe

by Thomas Kennedy

It is easy to pick on craven politicians who evade questions, speak in platitudes, and offer no actual policy commitments. Yet our society needs to deeply reflect on whether the answer to these mass shootings is really the further militarization of our society.

Anthony Bourdain showed us how to connect and understand our fellow humans.

by Center for Community Change

Last week was a sorrowful week. We lost two giants of American culture with the deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain. We learned that suicide has been on the […]

Criminalizing Immigrants Puts Them At Risk During Hurricanes And Other Disasters

by Thomas Kennedy

In the midst of the tragedy that befell the people of Texas during Hurricane Harvey, I wrote an article detailing the hardships endured by the undocumented immigrant community of Houston […]

America’s Real Poverty Rate

by Salvatore Babones

Salvatore Babones is an American sociologist at the University of Sydney.  His research takes a long-term perspective to understanding problems of inequality and development.  His next book, Benchmarking America (http://benchmarkingamerica.com) […]

Things we should freak out over instead of Ebola

by Olivia Chow

Dear everybody — Please stop freaking out about Ebola. I’m not making light of illness, I’m just trying to bring some sanity back to what the real threats in our […]

Change Wire: We tell the stories of real people making real change

by Marisol Bello

Early this year, Oprah Winfrey became the first black woman to receive the Golden Globes’ annual Cecil B. DeMille award for lifetime achievement. In a rousing speech accepting the honor, […]

Make Your Voice Heard. Go Vote In Tuesday’s Local Elections.

by Thomas Kennedy

During the 2016 election cycle, I frequently heard people complaining about the impossibility of escaping the daily barrage of news and coverage regarding the Presidential race. Both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump spent more than $6.8 billion to ensure that their messages reached voters. The massive price tag ensured an over-saturation of advertising in various forms of media.

The Politics of Hate

by Kica Matos

This piece was originally published on The Hill. Last week was one of those moments in history when the politics of hatred seized hold and as a nation we fell […]

How New York’s “Fight for $15” Launched a Nationwide Movement

by Fred McKissack Jr.

Co-authored by Center for Community Change Writing Fellow Wendi C. Thomas. Originally published in the American Prospect. Brooklyn car-wash worker Angel Rebolledo and Bronx fast-food employee Flavia Cabral work in […]

I Am the 4 Percent

by Anton Conkle

My upbringing wasn’t the most stable of environments.  I bounced around a lot, often to less than glamorous neighborhoods.  My family wasn’t a traditional, nuclear or even agreeable one at […]

The Flint Lesson: When the Poor Talk, We Must Listen

by Wendi C. Thomas

Photo courtesy of Steve Neavling/Motor City Muckraker Imagine the harm that could have been avoided in Flint if only government officials believed the residents. As far back as May 2014, […]

Change Champion: Voces de la Frontera

by Zachary Langway

Christine Neumann-Ortiz is the founding executive director of Voces de la Frontera in Wisconsin, and a state and national leader in the immigrant rights movement. Through her leadership, Voces has […]

Trump’s Tax Plan Is A Reverse Robin Hood Ploy

by Marcella Vitulli

Here’s how Trump’s plan pads the pockets of the rich at the expense of everyday families and seniors.

Taking the bus now dangerous if you are an immigrant

by Thomas Kennedy

The Greyhound bus company is currently in the midst of a public relations disaster due to a series of videos which were released on the internet by the organization I […]

We are Wired for Change

by Cristina Rayas

Community Change’s Communications Fellows Program is a visionary approach to building power and leaders among our communities – the power to be the ones to tell their truths and be […]

Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Jody Ellis

Where to go When There’s Nowhere to Go: How Covenant House is Fighting to Solve the Youth Homeless Crisis, One Kid at a time Dash was a first year college […]

Trump Voters and I Have One Thing in Common: We’re Scared of Losing Medicaid

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

I recently read about a county in Kentucky that is typical of the kinds of depressed white communities that have dominated the news since Trump’s election. Owsley County is 83 […]

Change Champion: Frances Fox Piven

by Allison Mitchell

Tonight, we will honor six individuals and organizations for their work in social justice at the 2011 Community Change Champion Awards.  An honoree this evening, Professor Frances Fox Piven is […]

Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Willie Francois

The lives of children should not be stymied by social indifference and condemned to the carnivorous margins of society because their parents simply cannot afford quality childcare. For too many […]

The livelihood of our families at the heart of our #OneStruggle

by Olivia Chow

Can we talk about these last few days? They have been emotional. We ended last week taking part in rallies and events across the country celebrating the long anticipated administrative […]

House Republicans: Our Deadline is August 2nd

by Jingru Huang

As House Republicans debate whether or not they will act on immigration reform, they should remember the deadline of Aug. 2nd that the Fair Immigration Reform Movement (FIRM) has set […]

DACA’s One Year Anniversary

by Jingru Huang

A year ago, President Obama announced the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program for young people who were brought to the U.S. when they were children by their immigrant […]

“My Family Is Not Illegal.”

by Shikun Sun

 It vividly occurred to me at the October 8th rally outside the U.S. Capitol Building that it’s time to discuss immigration legislation now and to grant undocumented immigrants a chance […]

Housing Trust Funds: Protecting Affordable Living

by Michael Anderson

One of the most difficult hardships facing low-income people in the United States is the lack of affordable housing due to the gross mismatch between income and housing costs. This recent […]

Immigrant Children Are Trump’s Collateral Damage

by Thomas Kennedy

All these actions by the administration put our children and their families under threat more than ever before.

Florida Lawmakers Are Taking Anti-immigrant Bias To New Heights And Preparing To Hurt More Families In The Process

by Thomas Kennedy

Early in 2017, Donald Trump signed an executive order threatening to rescind federal funds from local municipalities that refuse to criminalize immigrant communities. The executive order has suffered numerous legal […]

Not same-sex marriage, not the Affordable Care Act, that OTHER Supreme Court ruling!

by Olivia Chow

This has been a big week for the United States Supreme Court. Major decisions given over the past two days: to keep in place the Affordable Care Act’s current tax […]

Kwanzaa is the perfect holiday for activism

by Wendi C. Thomas

When I think of the holidays, I think of mistletoe and tinsel, Nativity scenes and presents under the tree. But this year, visions of sugarplums have been replaced by the […]

Change Champion: George Gresham

by Allison Mitchell

For today’s featured 2011 Community Change Champion, I’d like you to meet Geroge Gresham, the President of 1199 SEIU United Health Care Workers East. George Gresham was elected 1199SEIU President in […]

Low-Income Families Bear the Greatest Burden

by Robin Curran

Americans across the country felt the consequences of the government shutdown. Federal employees were jobless until further notice. National parks, landmarks, and museums were closed. Wedding plans were disrupted. School […]

What We Hope to Hear During the State of the Union

by Loryn Wilson

This year’s State of the Union follows the President’s promise that he will make economic inequality a top priority for the rest of his presidency. But what will President Obama […]

Native Voices Once Silenced, Now Heard

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

Autumn Harry enjoys her beloved Pyramid Lake. Photo courtesy of Autumn Harry. Autumn Harry has spent her twenty three years living on the Paiute reservation in northern Nevada. She will […]

My heart aches to see the struggle on Skid Row

by Michael Anderson

This post was originally published on MomsRising.org. The Housing Trust Fund Project team spent much of the last week of June in Los Angeles and stayed at a hotel directly […]

Trump’s Hypocrisy On Full Display: Bomb Syria, But Don’t Let Syrians In

by Thomas Kennedy

Over 400,000 Syrians have been killed since the outbreak of the Syrian civil war, yet the Trump administration has done nothing about it.

St. Louis Case: Another Black Man Shot, Another Excuse

by Fred McKissack Jr.

This article first appeared on The Progressive. The June 21 shooting of a black police officer in St. Louis County by another officer has been  described as “friendly fire.” That’s a laughably […]

I went to the hospital to stay sane. I left with bills I could never pay.

by Stephanie Land

Originally published on Vox. My boyfriend Scott and I had just broken up. This boy who’d once brought me flowers had turned possessive and controlling. Sleep-deprived from constant drama and […]

Miami Airport Workers Demand Fair Wages And Health Insurance

by Thomas Kennedy

This article originally appeared on the Huffington Post. Summer is a busy time for airports all across this country, but in a major tourist destination like Miami, this is especially […]

Lack of Black Children’s Books Are Still a Problem

by Fred McKissack Jr.

Photo credits to Pettifoggist.  Originally published on The Undefeated. My mother and my father remember chatting with friends at a nondescript table at the 1989 American Library Association (ALA) annual […]

Military Families Serve Our Country. Now It’s Time For Our Country To Serve Military Families.

by Sharisse Tracey

As a military spouse, I see firsthand how civilians might think our families are a protected class because our job description is basically to protect America. But we face the […]

What do you do when you can’t afford childcare? You get creative.

by Stephanie Land

Written by Center for Community Change Writing Fellow Stephanie Land. Originally posted on the Washington Post. At the start of my 10-minute break during a two-hour writing workshop, I looked […]

Looking for “Whitelash”

by Wendi C. Thomas

Originally published by Neiman Reports.  The signs that someone like Donald Trump was coming were right there, in online comments lousy with creatively spelled racial slurs that slipped past even […]

I’m Not A Dreamer Or Immigrant, But We Share Common Values

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

My encounter with Dreamers last month happened by chance. I was sitting in my local library when an employee tapped me on the shoulder, and asked in hush-hush please speak […]

Change Champion: Pramila Jayapal & OneAmerica

by Zachary Langway

Today, we kick off our series featuring the 2011 Community Change Champions by introducing you to Pramila Jayapal, the founder and executive director of OneAmerica. Started in the wake of 9/11, […]

Doing The Right Thing Can Still Get You Killed … If You Are Black

by Wendi C. Thomas

Photo Credits to Fibonacci Blue.  Originally published on The Undefeated.  I don’t know how other people buy cellphones. Me, I make sure I’m getting all the gigabytes I can. Just in […]

Police Already Have Broad Powers to Detain Us; And the Supreme Court Gave Them Even More

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

Photo credits: Tony Webster. Source: Flickr Creative Commons.  Originally published on Common Dreams.  I don’t want to end up like Alton Sterling. Or Philando Castile. Or Eric Garner. Or Freddie […]

Continuing the unfinished work of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy

by Center for Community Change

As we are memorializing the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. this week during the 50th anniversary of his assassination, we are reminded that the Center for Community Change’s […]

Sweet Home Alabama?

by Megan Salzman

While the news of Occupy Wall Street is grabbing media attention, it is important not to lose sight of what is happening in Alabama. Effective last month, Alabama law requires […]

How The Gig Economy is Changing Work As We Know It

by Catherine Bugayong

As the gig economy continues to grow, how has it changed the way we think of work, the economy, and laborers? In this episode of “A Living Wage,” Catherine Bugayong […]

Politicians must stop dancing to the mantra of ‘It’s a Man’s, Man’s, Man’s World’

by Deirdra Reed

Originally posted on The Hill’s Congress Blog. In 1966, the “King of Soul,” James Brown, proclaimed, “It’s a man’s, man’s, man’s world!” And ever since, there hasn’t been a Brown […]

A Story Worth Covering

by Ricardo Ramirez

A so-called “rally” with Republicans’ leading anti-immigrant spokesman, Rep. Steve King (R-IA), flopped big time this week. While the event was widely publicized as a national kickoff to stir up […]

House Republicans- Where Are Your Priorities?

by Shikun Sun

Late last week, the House passed a bill to restore regular federal funding to border security during the shutdown. This bill, called the Border Security and Safety Act, would ensure […]

GOP: Stop Pandering and Start Acting

by Jordann Lee

This week, House Republicans released a video in celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month. Prominent House Republicans, including Speaker of the House John Boehner and House Majority Leader Eric Cantor lauded Hispanics for […]

Turning Anger Into Hope

by Deepak Bhargava

Americans are angry these days. You can see it at the Occupy Wall Street protests. You see it in states where governors have pushed through severe anti-union measures that are […]

Kids shouldn’t be sent home for lice, but schools can’t ignore the issue either

by Stephanie Land

This article previously appeared on The Washington Post Last night, my 3-year-old daughter made soft, singing noises while she dipped a plastic boat in and out of the bubbles of […]

The Cruel Act: House Republicans Want to Reduce Food Stamps Program

by Jordann Lee

“The one who is unwilling to work shall not eat.” -Representative Stephen Fincher (R-Tenn.) This quote from Republican Rep. Stephen Fincher wowed me for many reasons; it’s catchy, snarky, cunning […]

Remembering Mike Brown

by Loryn Wilson

On Saturday, an unarmed 18-year-old African-American teenager named Mike Brown was shot and killed by police in Ferguson, Missouri. He had planned to start college yesterday—and because of an unjustified […]

Social Media, Social Good…Social Justice?

by Zachary Langway

How effective can social media be in creating “social good?”  And moreover, is there a way to connect enough dots so that social media can advance social justice here in […]

Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Willie Francois

And the Young Shall Save Us So many economic protections are at stake with this new Congress. The most consequential midterm elections of our lifetime awaited our robust participation last […]

Face Our Families!

by Erin Brock

Fair Immigration Reform Movement (FIRM) groups and allies will rally across the country on Saturday calling for the House GOP leadership to step up and support comprehensive immigration reform that […]

Obstruction of Justice: The SAFE Act

by Adam Isaacson

This week, the House Judiciary Committee approved the Strengthen and Fortify Enforcement (SAFE) Act, with Immigration Subcommittee Chairman Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.) leading the charge. With the bill’s extreme policies, […]

We need gun control that disarms the public and the police

by Thomas Kennedy

“I love this shit.” That’s what White County, Tenn. Sheriff Oddie Shoupe said after ordering one of his deputies to open fire on Michael Dial, a man who was attempting […]

We’re Making Significant Steps Toward a New Federal Minimum Wage

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

In my years participating in progressive movements, fighting “the good fight” alongside other visionary activists and progressives with very different personalities, different strategies, and different campaigning styles, I have noticed […]

What’s Your Story?

by Zachary Langway

We all have a story.  And we all want our story to be heard.  This seemed to be a recurring theme weaved into many of yesterday’s presentations at the Social […]

Redefining the Way We Talk About Poverty

by Donna DeLaCruz

The Center for Community Change (CCC) has launched a major initiative to dismantle the barriers that create and sustain poverty. CCC aims to galvanize a social movement to generate the […]

South Florida Immigrants And Communities Of Color Still Struggling To Recover Post-Irma

by Thomas Kennedy

In the last couple of weeks, Floridians have struggled with Hurricane Irma and its aftermath. Foreseeing the impact that this storm would have on low-income communities, a coalition of various […]

Only the Beginning: Seattle Wins the Fight for 15

by Loryn Wilson

Today, Seattle lawmakers reached a compromise deal to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. The city’s minimum wage hike reflects a growing grassroots movement across the country to […]

Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Bonnie Page

My Story I grew up in the southeast area of Washington, DC and I attended Eastern Senior High School. The year was 1971, I was 15 years old and in […]

October 5th, 2013: Join the Fight!

by Robin Curran

  On Saturday, October 5th, more than 80 mobilization efforts are planned to take place across the country to celebrate the National Day of Dignity and Respect. These efforts will […]

Deportation force harasses Florida’s hard-working immigrant families

by Thomas Kennedy

Almost two years ago, I wrote a story published in the HuffPost about the silent raids that are disappearing people from our community in South Florida. I am sad to […]

Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Melissa Chadburn

Today, the James Beard Foundation announced its 2019 slate of finalists. This “short list” of nominees honors the year’s outstanding restaurants, chefs, and food-centric journalism, books, and broadcast media. Community […]

Out on the Town: Paying Our Restaurant Workers (A Living Wage: Episode 3)

by Catherine Bugayong

Going out is such a special treat, and it’s a whole team of people that make this experience so enjoyable. In this episode of “A Living Wage,” I hit the […]

Preparing for Mass Mobilizations Across the Country on October 5th

by Petra Falcon

Thousands of families across the country will mobilize on streets across the country on October 5th, and here’s why: Although we’ve sent out a very clear message at the polls, […]

How They See Us: The Impacts of Implicit Biases in Healthcare

by Michael Jackson

It should’ve been the happiest time of my life. I was happily married, had a wonderful son, and had just started as a PhD student at a prestigious Ivy League […]

Transforming Pain into Power a Year After a Mass Raid

by Isaias G

Around 150 people were gathered and said “Presente” after the names of each of person deported a year ago was read out loud. This was a gathering in early April […]

Another unarmed Black man dies in custody of the Las Vegas police

by Nissa Tzun

Byron Williams death leaves another Las Vegas family seeking answers in an in-custody death case with literal dark spots in the story

Real Families Need Real Food Assistance

by Center for Community Change

The Trump administration is proposing a new cut to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, known as SNAP, that would leave more than 3 million people without enough food to eat.  These […]

2020 – the 100th anniversary of the first vote for gender equality – will be the year of women.

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

The old saw, “It was the best of times; it was the worst of times” may apply to the status of  women in America — their gains, their travails, their […]

Resist normalizing violence in any form

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

Riley Howell and  Kendrick Castillo are heroes, yes. They are martyrs too. They are also victims. On April 30,  a lone gunman entered a campus building at the University of […]

Voices Of Everyday Leaders

by Maya Boddie

Grassroots Partners Come Together to Celebrate Big Wins There have been major wins amongst the partners over the past year, such as SPACEs in Action’s $15.8 million win for Birth […]

“What’s not to love about Charleston? Or Santa Fe?”

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

What was I watching? A bright, chipper afternoon edition of The Today Show on NBC. For this segment, the TV hosts invited an editor from Travel and Leisure magazine to […]

Voices of Everyday Leaders

by Melissa Chadburn

De Colores: Bright Colors of Love  This is where I begin. I come from poverty and group homes throughout Los Angeles. There are stories along the 405 N that I will […]

How Community Organizing Helped Me Branch Out While Staying Grounded in My Roots

by Jamal Meneide

We all want to see our communities grow into places where all families can thrive. Correia’s reflections reveal how his experience with community engagement and organizing can result in environmental justice and overall powerful change.

A NIGHTMARE OF RACIAL ANIMOSITY OVERTAKING AMERICA

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

A bad dream is a bad experience. But a truly terrible experience occurs when a bad dream feels like a premonition. Judging by media stories, online commentary and conversations with […]

The case for D.C. statehood is really about voting rights

by Mikka Macdonald

time for a change and reforms to our democracy so that we are truly by and for the people. The case for D.C. statehood is part of that charge and with more and more people leaning into the fight we might just get the change we need.

Our Voices Unite in Washington, Reminding Congress #Not1Dollar for ICE

by Cristina Rayas

#NOT1DOLLAR means no more money to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). What we, the Fair Immigration Reform Movement (FIRM and FIRM Action), […]

In memory of Toni Morrison

by Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

The first book that I read by Toni Morrison was her artfully bejeweled 1970 novel, The Bluest Eye. I was in the upper grades in high school, maybe 16 or […]

Healthcare is a Human Right. Here’s Why it Should Be Accessible to Everyone.

by Michael Jackson

For my family, the high costs of healthcare and its inaccessibility meant a stressful late night call from my son from a hospital bed and thousands of dollars in avoidable […]

There are no degrees of blackness

by Michael Jackson

“Brother brother, sister sister If you’re miss or if you’re mister Listen please to this fact Black is black is black is black”  Lyrics from Black is Black by Jungle […]

Texas will turn blue this decade

by Grecia Lima

Another Republican member of Congress announced their plans to vacate their seat, reinforcing what we know: Texas is a swing state. Thanks to a renewal of the long-held tradition of […]

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